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Indirect questions

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Indirect questions

Postby Amy » Sun Aug 08, 2004 3:38 pm

I understand these in principle, but...... :? are these correct...

Apud consules toti civitati diximus Lucium virum bonum esse; alterum illud malum fecisse.
Among the consuls all of the citizens said Lucius was a good man; but with the other we made him out to be bad (???)
I know what the last part SHOULD be...literal translation anyone?

Servos tuos in agros urbi proximos duci puto.
I think your slaves were led into fields close to the town.

Consuli ipsi agros Helvetiorum milia passuum duo a flumine abesse nuntiunt.
They are announcing to the consul himself that the Helvetian fields are missing two miles from the river? :roll:

I hope to sail to Italy next summer; I hear that the cities there are very beautiful.
Navgatura ad Italiam aestate postera spero; urbes ibi pulcherrimas esse audio.

The leaders know that the enemy is approaching and that many soldiers have left the camp from fear of death.
Duces hostes accedere et milites multos castra discessisse timore mortis sciunt.

We bade our comrades farewell and said that we hoped to see them within a few years.
Valere iussimus sociis nostris et diximus scire visurum eis annis paucis.

gratias vobis ago!
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Postby Turpissimus » Sun Aug 08, 2004 4:50 pm

diximus


We said

abesse


also means to be distant.

Navgatura ad Italiam aestate postera spero; urbes ibi pulcherrimas esse audio.


Spero, I think, takes a prolative infinitve. There is no need to use a future infinitive, which is what I think you were aiming at there (although you didn't do it). Also, I'd be minded to use the word proximus, but if your grammar book is expecting posterus, I suppose that's ok.

Also, generally in latin word order in indirect speech, the "speaking word" comes at the start of the sentence.

I think to bid farewell to someone is just "valere". I don't know what "iussimus" is doing there. You're not ordering anyone.

Also, Why did you title this thread indirect questions? This is plain old indirect speech.
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Postby whiteoctave » Sun Aug 08, 2004 5:16 pm

spero typically takes accusative and future infinitive.

the idiom for bidding farewell is valere iubere.

civitati looks dative.

~D
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Postby Turpissimus » Sun Aug 08, 2004 5:31 pm

WhiteO wrote:spero typically takes accusative and future infinitive.

the idiom for bidding farewell is valere iubere.


Blast! There are some ape-sized holes in my knowledge. So she you need "navigatura esse"?
Last edited by Turpissimus on Sun Aug 08, 2004 6:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Indirect questions

Postby Skylax » Sun Aug 08, 2004 5:53 pm

Hello Amy !
I see your are a good learner !
I made a few more corrections here.
Please don't wonder why my English is so strange : I am a native French speaker. So :


Amy wrote:alterum illud malum fecisse.


...(but we said) that the other (man) had done this evil (thing)

Servos tuos in agros urbi proximos duci puto.
I think your slaves were led into fields close to the town.


"are led", not "were", which should be DUCTOS ESSE

nuntiunt.

NUNTIANT from NUNTIARE (present stem NUNTIA-)


I hope to sail to Italy next summer; I hear that the cities there are very beautiful.
Navgatura ad Italiam aestate postera spero; urbes ibi pulcherrimas esse audio.

so : ME NAVIGATURAM ESSE... SPERO

The leaders know that the enemy is approaching and that many soldiers have left the camp from fear of death.
Duces hostes accedere et milites multos castra discessisse timore mortis sciunt.

If you use DISCESSISSE (have departed), then it is A CASTRIS (from the camp), but you may use CASTRA RELIQUISSE (from RELINQUO "leave")

We bade our comrades farewell and said that we hoped to see them within a few years.
Valere iussimus sociis nostris et diximus scire visurum eis annis paucis.


A difficult one.
SOCIIS NOSTRIS should be SOCIOS NOSTROS accusative as the subject of VALERE in the infinitive clause, litterally "we ordered that our comrades shoud be healthy".

Now after DIXIMUS we have two infinitive clauses, the second being direct object of the first one, so

DIXIMUS (1) NOS SPERARE (2) NOS EOS PAUCIS ANNIS (?) VISUROS ESSE.

but if "we" are girls, it is VISURAS ESSE.

SI TIBI AUXILIO FUI GAUDEO
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Postby Amy » Sun Aug 08, 2004 6:07 pm

Good point about the thread title :roll:
and thanks everyone! all the corrections make so much sense. Turpissimus, Jenney says omitting esse is fine but neither d'ooge nor wheelock mentions it so it's probably inappropriate except for insert special situation here.
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