Textkit Logo

More questions from N&H

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

More questions from N&H

Postby phil » Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:18 pm

I have struck trouble in the section dealing with composite subjects.
You and your brother will be killed by the enemy. Tu fraterque tuus ab hostibus necabuntur. Where should the -que go, there or after the tuus?
You and I and our friends will set out. Tu et ego et amici nostri proficiscemur. Is this the correct way to list things separated by 'and's?
The king and queen are dear to all of the citizens. Rex reginaque omnibus civibus cari sunt. Is masculine plural (cari) correct here? Plural because there are two subjects, and masuline because one of them is a bloke?
The king lost his kingdom and his riches, the things most pleasant to him. Rex regnum divitiasque perdidit, res ei iucundas. Res here in accusative, and iucundas agreeing with it. Then again, I read in Grote's notes that 'res' doesn't mean thing as in some unnamed item, as in 'give me that thing on the table', but rather more affairs, matters etc.
and finally
He and I will go away. Is et ego discedemus. This just looks ugly, and sounds ugly when I say it. Is there a better way?

I finally ordered a copy of Allen and Greenough today, so hopefully in a few weeks I'll be able to answer some of these myself!
phpbb
phil
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Re: More questions from N&H

Postby benissimus » Wed Aug 04, 2004 6:44 am

phil wrote:I have struck trouble in the section dealing with composite subjects.
You and your brother will be killed by the enemy. Tu fraterque tuus ab hostibus necabuntur. Where should the -que go, there or after the tuus?

"you and your brother" would govern a second person plural verb, not third person plural, as in "you two, you and your brother, will be killed by the enemy". The rule is that if there is any "you", "I", or "we" in the sentence the verb cannot be third person, and if there is any "I" or "we" it cannot be second person. This rule also exists in English but it is harder to tell because they usually conjugate the same way anyway. Other than that, it looks fine including the position of -que.

You and I and our friends will set out. Tu et ego et amici nostri proficiscemur. Is this the correct way to list things separated by 'and's?

There is nothing incorrect with this sentence. I would prefer to say "we and our friends", but you can't change what the book says (unless you want to...).

The king and queen are dear to all of the citizens. Rex reginaque omnibus civibus cari sunt. Is masculine plural (cari) correct here? Plural because there are two subjects, and masuline because one of them is a bloke?

Yes, cari should be masculine plural for just that reason. Don't forget that forms of esse usually do not come at the end of a sentence.

The king lost his kingdom and his riches, the things most pleasant to him. Rex regnum divitiasque perdidit, res ei iucundas. Res here in accusative, and iucundas agreeing with it. Then again, I read in Grote's notes that 'res' doesn't mean thing as in some unnamed item, as in 'give me that thing on the table', but rather more affairs, matters etc.

I think res is ok in this usage, a kingdom and wealth are affairs of a sort. Another option would be to say something with a neuter plural like ea iucundissima sibi. "most pleasant" should be a superlative; "to him" should be reflexive.

He and I will go away. Is et ego discedemus. This just looks ugly, and sounds ugly when I say it. Is there a better way?

You can choose another verb, or just say nos discedemus, but that would be less specific.

I finally ordered a copy of Allen and Greenough today, so hopefully in a few weeks I'll be able to answer some of these myself!

Yay
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby phil » Wed Aug 04, 2004 8:03 pm

Thank you again. Or rather, iterum gratias tibi ago. :)
phpbb
phil
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Postby klewlis » Wed Aug 04, 2004 8:26 pm

you guys are both awesome. :)
User avatar
klewlis
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2003 1:48 pm
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Postby phil » Thu Aug 05, 2004 1:37 am

one awesome, one awful! :wink:
phpbb
phil
Textkit Fan
 
Posts: 254
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2003 2:01 am
Location: Wellington, New Zealand

Postby Episcopus » Thu Aug 05, 2004 12:58 pm

benissimus should have told you also that the romans say 'ego' first whilst in english idiom it is said 'he and I' etc.
User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Majestic-12 [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 24 guests