Textkit Logo

Need Help Translating some sentencing someone gave me please

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

Need Help Translating some sentencing someone gave me please

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:12 pm

Hey guys. My friend took a latin class and this is one of the last quizzes he got in the class. Can you help me figure out what they say. He won't tell me! And his paper has some flat lines over some of the letters at the end of words that I can't put on the computer. Any help would be awesome!


1. Eam cum litteris eius ad vos in patria Romanorum mittemus.

2. Etiam post annos multos malosque nemo veritatem totam dixerat.

3. Didiceratis nihil de consiliis consulis ilius.

4. Rationes alterius filiae heri non fuerunt eadem.

5. Vicerimus nec vitia nostra nec timores nostros.

6. Mater paterque tuus te bene docuerunt, mi amice care, quod tu semper pecuniam et dona miseris hominibus dabas.

7. Filia cara eius cum uno amico in alium locum fugiebat.

8. Adulescentes in via magna multam amiserant.

9. Nullus locus utaraum litterarum istarum est bonus verusque.

10. Discipuli et discipulae, facite vestra officia: discite verba Latina!
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby benissimus » Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:22 pm

Welcome to the forum. Please familarize yourself with the rules for requesting translation help:
http://www.textkit.com/greek-latin-foru ... 1589#11589
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:28 pm

Hi! Thanks so much. I am new to boards, hello, hehe, and didin't know exactly where to post and how to go about it. I am just learning Latin myself and my friend has a big lead on me. He knows more declensions, words, and conjugations than I do. Any help would be great. Thanks for moving my post to the right location, it looks like helpl is already granted!
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby benissimus » Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:45 pm

No problem. If you can explain what exactly is confusing, or show an effort to do the exercises, then we will be glad to help. If your friend needs help then maybe you can convince him to show attempts, or throw a pie at him if he is unwilling. It would not be right for us to just give out answers to people who ask for them though, without them learning anything in the process.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:10 pm

ok, first attempt.

1. Eam cum litteris eius ad vos in patria Romanorum mittemus.

We shall send her with the letter of his to you in the country of the romans.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:17 pm

ok, second attempt.

2. Etiam post annos multos malosque nemo veritatem totam dixerat.

He had spoken the whole truth even after many bad year.

- i'm not sure where the nemo "no one" comes in. thanks again. i'll keep posting! thanks for the help!
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:24 pm

third attempt.

3. Didiceratis nihil de consiliis consulis ilius.

You had learned nothing from the counsel of this counsel.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:30 pm

fourth attempt!

4. Rationes alterius filiae heri non fuerunt eadem.

The reasoning of the second daughter has not been good yesterday.

- side note, i put "eadem" in the original, when i think it is actually written "eaedem", which i don't know what it means cause i can't find it anywhere. am i doing ok so far guys?
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:34 pm

fifth attempt.

5. Vicerimus nec vitia nostra nec timores nostros.

We shall have conquered neither our faults nor our fears.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:43 pm

sixth attempt,

6. Mater paterque tuus te bene docuerunt, mi amice care, quod tu semper pecuniam et dona miseris hominibus dabas.

My dear friend, your mother and father have taught you well, because you shall have sent money and gifts to the men you were offering.

that one was a little tricky for me. the "miseris hominibus dabas" part especially. i don't know how to make that into a sentence.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:49 pm

Seventh attempt.

7. Filia cara eius cum uno amico in alium locum fugiebat.

He was fleeing his dear daughter of his one friend in another place.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Wed Jul 14, 2004 11:56 pm

eigth attempt

8. Adulescentes in via magna multam amiserant.

The young men had to let go of many things in the big street.

-this one is weird for me. thanks.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 12:00 am

ninth attempt!

9. Nullus locus utaraum litterarum istarum est bonus verusque.

No place in these letters are good and true.

- i had difficulty with "nullus locus utarum". thanks.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 12:04 am

tenth attempt!

10. Discipuli et discipulae, facite vestra officia: discite verba Latina!

Men and women students, do your duty: learn the latin word!
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 12:05 am

Ok, I sat down and tried my best. This was actually really fun because I didn't think I was capable to translate most of this yet, but I think I did fairly well. If anybody can help me correct my mistakes, if any (LOL), I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:52 am

does anybody have any comments? i'm not very good at latin and i know that these have problems. thanks.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:59 am

I'll be editing this post as I find more to talk about.



latinbeginsnow wrote:10. Discipuli et discipulae, facite vestra officia: discite verba Latina!

Men and women students, do your duty: learn the latin word!


Not your doing, but I always thought any group of both male and females was referred to in the masculine.

Also, "verba Latina" is in the accusative plural. So "learn the Latin words." I guess you could make that "learn the latin language" to sound better in english though..

latinbeginsnow wrote:8. Adulescentes in via magna multam amiserant.

The young men had to let go of many things in the big street.


amiserant is in the pluperfect tense. "The young men had lost much in the large road." Seems like multam would be multum (or multa) to me, but I dunno.

latinbeginsnow wrote:7. Filia cara eius cum uno amico in alium locum fugiebat.

He was fleeing his dear daughter of his one friend in another place.


'Filia cara' is in the nominative. So it's the subject. eius is the genitive. I would think they'd use a possesive pronoun instead... "His dear daughter was running away into another place with one friend."

latinbeginsnow wrote:6. Mater paterque tuus te bene docuerunt, mi amice care, quod tu semper pecuniam et dona miseris hominibus dabas.

My dear friend, your mother and father have taught you well, because you shall have sent money and gifts to the men you were offering.


"Your mother and father taught you well, my dear friend, because you always gave money and gifts to wretched men."


On number 4, eadem is a form of idem, meaning 'the same'. It is 'is, ea, id' combined with an undeclined suffix 'dem'. All m's before the 'dem' become n's, as in 'eorundem' for 'eorumdem', 'eandem' for 'eamdem', etc.

2. Etiam post annos multos malosque nemo veritatem totam dixerat.

He had spoken the whole truth even after many bad year.


"Even after many bad years, noone had spoken the whole truth."
Titus Marius Crispus
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 2:00 am
Location: San Antonio, TX, USA

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 4:08 am

wow, thanks a lot for the help. there are some things you pointed out to me i definitely wouldn't have figured out on my own.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby latinbeginsnow » Thu Jul 15, 2004 4:56 am

Ok. So for number 4 I will try and say this:

Reason of their second daughter has not been the same yesterday.

Wow, I think that's a hard one.
latinbeginsnow
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2004 8:05 pm

Postby benissimus » Fri Jul 16, 2004 2:33 am

Ok, I had some time on my hands so here is my review. Thanks for posting your work this time so we know that we are working with someone who has a lot of initiative. In the future it would be better if you could keep it confined to a single post, unless you have something to add afterwards or want to reply to someone.

Sorry, T., if I overlapped anything you already covered...

latinbeginsnow wrote:1. Eam cum litteris eius ad vos in patria Romanorum mittemus.

We shall send her with the letter of his to you in the country of the romans.

This is correct. You could just say "his letter" instead of "the letter of his", either way is correct.

2. Etiam post annos multos malosque nemo veritatem totam dixerat.

He had spoken the whole truth even after many bad year.

- i'm not sure where the nemo "no one" comes in. thanks again. i'll keep posting! thanks for the help!

"many bad years". nemo is in the nominative and therefore is the subject of the sentence.

3. Didiceratis nihil de consiliis consulis ilius.

You had learned nothing from the counsel of this counsel.

consul, consulis means "consul", not "counsel" (consilium, -i). I can see how you could get these mixed up since I just did the same thing skimming it :oops: ille means "that", not "this".

4. Rationes alterius filiae heri non fuerunt eadem.

The reasoning of the second daughter has not been good yesterday.

- side note, i put "eadem" in the original, when i think it is actually written "eaedem", which i don't know what it means cause i can't find it anywhere. am i doing ok so far guys?

alter means "the other", not "second". Instead of "has not been... yesterday", it would be much better English to say "was not...". There is no word "good" in this sentence, eaedem means "the same" and agrees with rationes (fem. nom. plur.). rationes is plural, but I think the way you translated it is better in this case.

eaedem would make more sense. The suffix -dem is added onto the forms of the demonstrative pronoun is, ea, id (e.g. "eae+dem=eaedem", "eo+dem=eodem", but "is/id+dem=idem" and "eum/eam+dem=eundem/eandem"). In any case, it means "the same" and the part before the -dem is fulling declinable.

5. Vicerimus nec vitia nostra nec timores nostros.

We shall have conquered neither our faults nor our fears.

Correct :)

6. Mater paterque tuus te bene docuerunt, mi amice care, quod tu semper pecuniam et dona miseris hominibus dabas.

My dear friend, your mother and father have taught you well, because you shall have sent money and gifts to the men you were offering.

that one was a little tricky for me. the "miseris hominibus dabas" part especially. i don't know how to make that into a sentence.

dabas is in a past tense (imperfect), not future perfect. There is no word "offering" in this sentence; miseris is an adjective agreeing with hominibus and it means "wretched, unfortunate".

7. Filia cara eius cum uno amico in alium locum fugiebat.

He was fleeing his dear daughter of his one friend in another place.

Filia cara is the subject of the sentence. cum uno amico means "with one friend". in alium locum means "into another place.

8. Adulescentes in via magna multam amiserant.

The young men had to let go of many things in the big street.

-this one is weird for me. thanks.

multam means "much". I'm not sure why it is feminine here, but "many things" would be a neuter plural multa. amiserant means "had let go", not "had to let go".

9. Nullus locus utaraum litterarum istarum est bonus verusque.

No place in these letters are good and true.

- i had difficulty with "nullus locus utarum". thanks.

Am I correct in assuming that the word is utrarum? iste means "that", not "this". Locus is probably a passage in writing. It should go something like:
"No passage in either of those letters is good and true".

10. Discipuli et discipulae, facite vestra officia: discite verba Latina!

Men and women students, do your duty: learn the latin word!

"students" would suffice, though I have to say that the exaggeration of translating the genders perfectly captures the uber political correctness of this Latin :D. vestra officia is plural. verba Latina is plural.

Ok, I sat down and tried my best. This was actually really fun because I didn't think I was capable to translate most of this yet, but I think I did fairly well. If anybody can help me correct my mistakes, if any (LOL), I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.

You have a great attitude for learning Latin. I hope you enjoy it because that is the most important thing. What book are you using, Wheelock's? You seem to know all the tenses, declensions 1-3, conjugations 1-3, the demonstrative pronouns, and some other goodies. You are well on your way.

Ask the forum for help as much as you like, we don't mind helping people who want to learn.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 59 guests