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Avalon

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Avalon

Postby klewlis » Tue Jul 06, 2004 4:49 am

I saw the movie "Avalon" last night... very interesting, very strange... those who like the mind-twisting reality shows but with asian movie style will like this.

Anyhoo, the idea of the movie is based on Arthur and there are many allusions throughout. One was a latin text saying the following:

hic iacet arthurus
rex quondam rex que futurus

And I think it's supposed to say:
Here lies Arthur,
once king and future king.

But that's weird because arthurus and hic are both nominative. and I'm not sure about the second part either. I guess nominative works in the second phrase if the assumed verb is stative (which would of course make sense).

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Postby whiteoctave » Tue Jul 06, 2004 6:43 am

hic is adverbial so effectively parenthetical in the grammer. arthurus is subjects and the two rex's stand in apposition with it. perhaps the idiomatic order of english in the translation is the confusion, since it delays the subject; 'arthur lies here' may be clearer.

~d
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Postby klewlis » Tue Jul 06, 2004 2:45 pm

oops. of course hic is adverbial.

:)
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Postby bingley » Thu Jul 08, 2004 7:49 am

Usually translated as 'Here lies Arthur, the once and future king'
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