Textkit Logo

quam or et for "than"?

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

quam or et for "than"?

Postby NelsonN » Fri Jun 11, 2004 12:22 am

Should quam be more appropriate instead of the first et below?

Instead of:
Tu es mendax peior, mi amice, et Plauto et Terentio!

This:
Tu es mendax peior, mi amice, quam Plauto et Terentio!

I understand that "et" can be used as "than" as well.

Also, "et Plauto et Terentio!", was translated as "than both Plautus and Terence! " seems like a stretch to add the word "both" in the translation. Don't tell me that you can translate a single "et" into "than both" cause this will surely throw me for a loop.

As you can tell, I am scraching my head....
NelsonN
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2004 7:59 pm
Location: Puerto Rico

Re: quam or et for "than"?

Postby benissimus » Fri Jun 11, 2004 12:49 am

NelsonN wrote:Should quam be more appropriate instead of the first et below?

Instead of:
Tu es mendax peior, mi amice, et Plauto et Terentio!

Et... et... is what means "both... and...".

The "than" comes from the Ablative of Comparison.

This:
Tu es mendax peior, mi amice, quam Plauto et Terentio!

This is redundant, as you should either choose quam or Ablative of Comparison. Your two choices are:

1.) ...et Plauto et Terentio!
2.) ...quam et Plautus et Terentius!

The et has nothing to do with "than"; the "both...and..." statement was grammatically entirely separate from the comparison.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Re: quam or et for "than"?

Postby NelsonN » Fri Jun 11, 2004 2:11 am

benissimus wrote:The et has nothing to do with "than"; the "both...and..." statement was grammatically entirely separate from the comparison.


OK. I re-read my dictionary again. Looks like I made a mistake when I was reading the definition of "et."

Thanks.
NelsonN
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2004 7:59 pm
Location: Puerto Rico


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: AlexEmp, Bing [Bot] and 77 guests