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Aliquo tandem modo

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Aliquo tandem modo

Postby pb » Fri Jun 04, 2004 3:15 pm

Hi! does anyone know how I should translate the 'tandem' in 'aliquo tandem modo' ?

I know that basically the 'aliquo modo' is 'in some way'

from the context the nearest that I have any "feel" for is where Lewis & Short offer =>


Tandem

B. In partic., in interrogative clauses, pray, pray now, now, then: quid tandem, what in the world, etc. (very freq. in class. prose):


making me think of: 'in some unknown way'

any ideas?
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Postby ptran » Fri Jun 04, 2004 4:31 pm

Can you post the rest of the sentence or give the passage?
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the whole sentence:

Postby pb » Sat Jun 05, 2004 12:24 pm

Haec Propositio paradoxum est, & ex terminis ipsis magnam praesfert improbabilitatem, quia luminis est illustrare, non autem obscurare superficiem corporis opaci, ad quam terminatur, & cui aliquo tandem modo se communicat.
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Postby benissimus » Mon Jun 07, 2004 1:33 pm

I think in this case tandem would mean "at last / in the end". Aliquo is probably an adverb here meaning "wherever", as it would be redundant to have two relative pronouns right next to each other.
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Postby ptran » Thu Jun 10, 2004 2:42 pm

What are the two relative pronouns next to one another? "Aliquo" is an indefinite adjective/pronoun/adverb, and "cui" is definitely the relative pronoun. Do we all agree that the antecedent of "cui" is "superficiem"?

I'm leaning with you towards "tandem" meaning "finally" as a summary of argument, used much like "denique." Can someone look up "tandem" used with other adjectives in the OLD? Mine's in the shop.

Who's the author of the passage? Maybe we ought to ante up and post our translations for the passage?
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Postby ptran » Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:52 pm

But isn't it an indefinite adjective modifying "modo"?

"To/for which it finally imparts itself in some way."
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Postby benissimus » Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:59 pm

Ah, that makes a lot more sense. I think I had a blond moment.
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Postby pb » Tue Jun 15, 2004 1:13 pm

Thans to everyone; That dialogue was very useful. The same author has a similar construction in other part of the book which appears similarly confusing to me; should I just take it literally?

"aliquam tandem latitudinem"

- from the complete sentence


Excipiatur deinde in tabella candita, vel in folio chartæ albæ super pavimento extensæ, conus prædictus, seu basis eius lucida CD, cum umbra GH, quam proijcit opacum EF insertum cono, & illuminatum in utroq; sui extremo E & F: quæ tamen umbra secundùm leges Opticas non erit exactissime præcisa, & terminata in uno punto G versùs una partem, & in uno alio puncto H versùs aliam: sed ratione foraminis AB, aliquam tandem latitudinem habentis, simulq; ratione Solis in latum extensi , aliave de causa erit confinium umbræ aliquo modo incertum propter penumbram quandam, & cum sensibili decremento, seu ut vocant exsumatione luminis per spatium IG inter certam umbram, & nitidum lumen ad unam partem prædictæ basis, & per spatium HL ad aliam partem.
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Postby ptran » Tue Jun 15, 2004 4:47 pm

Again, this tandem seems to be a summarizing adverb.

What the heck are you reading, some Geometry textbook or something?
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Postby Democritus » Wed Jun 16, 2004 1:03 am

Is this quote from Isaac Newton?
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