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verba grassatorum

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verba grassatorum

Postby klewlis » Wed Jun 02, 2004 12:23 am

alright, since I have had no luck in finding an online dictionary and do not have access to a paper one...

Here is my list of the specific words/terms that I am currently seeking. Can anyone help?

There are a couple for which I obviously do not want a literal translation (eg "loose cannon"), but an appropriate idomatic phrase. So be creative! (Apparently I am not ;)

white (as in caucasian... can i just use albus?)
headphones
"talking back"
brainwashed
rock (as in rock and roll, the noun)
rap (verb and noun... I've thought about just using oration words)
do-rags (as in hair bandanas)
stocking cap (ski cap, toque, whatever)
"ship us platinum"
dime
loose cannon
handguns
fingerprint (verb)
load (a gun)
cock (a gun)
pistols
checks (the money kind)
record (as in album)

There are also a few profanities that I will not post here, but think common swears... and if you have ideas for any of those please PM me with them.

Thanks!
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Postby benissimus » Wed Jun 02, 2004 8:10 am

Are you writing a rap song in Latin? :shock:
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby JuliaP » Wed Jun 02, 2004 10:00 am

Some of the characters in Colleen McCullough's "First Man in Rome" series occasionally used some choice Latin obscene swear words. I'll PM you with some. :)
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Postby auctor » Wed Jun 02, 2004 11:02 am

I was looking through CJ Fordyce's 1961 commentry on Catullus the other day... the blurb inside the front cover ends with the twee "a few poems which for good reason are rarely read have been omitted." Naturally my first move was to make a comparison with a 1998 text of the poems - parts of the body in the colloquial and sexual practices which may or may not be acceptable are described in amusingly florid language.

Nice to know that the Romans were less priggish than school-masters and Oxford Press were :roll:

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Postby klewlis » Wed Jun 02, 2004 2:19 pm

benissimus wrote:Are you writing a rap song in Latin? :shock:


lol. not writing, translating ;)

one of these days I will pm you with a bit or two for your feedback... I think you'd find it amusing, as I do.
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Postby klewlis » Wed Jun 02, 2004 2:25 pm

JuliaP wrote:Some of the characters in Colleen McCullough's "First Man in Rome" series occasionally used some choice Latin obscene swear words. I'll PM you with some. :)


Thanks Julia!
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Postby mariek » Wed Jun 02, 2004 3:50 pm

klewlis wrote:lol. not writing, translating ;)



Ah.... I see. Sounds like an interesting challenge. Especially when some artists (Public Enemy comes to mind) are pretty dense with their lyrics. When I say "dense", I mean there are A LOT of words, because they say it soooooo fast.
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Postby Episcopus » Wed Jun 02, 2004 6:23 pm

Just remember not to conjugate any verbs at all. Especially esse.
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Postby JuliaP » Wed Jun 02, 2004 7:30 pm

Episcopus wrote:Just remember not to conjugate any verbs at all. Especially esse.
lol
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Postby klewlis » Wed Jun 02, 2004 11:44 pm

mariek wrote:
klewlis wrote:lol. not writing, translating ;)



Ah.... I see. Sounds like an interesting challenge. Especially when some artists (Public Enemy comes to mind) are pretty dense with their lyrics. When I say "dense", I mean there are A LOT of words, because they say it soooooo fast.


It's quite fun, and definitely challenging, which is why I am doing it. It's a good way for me to practice. The toughest part is keeping the rhythm and rhyme--impossible to do it exactly, but I'm trying. :)
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Postby Episcopus » Thu Jun 03, 2004 3:04 pm

It could be especially hard translating a rapper such as Camron into Latin, because he hardly makes sense. The songs sound lovely though. As Steven knows (he is singing 'Diamonds and Pearls' right now). And so often you see phrases like "We be flippin 'em thangs" which are more ambiguous than Latin perfect passive participles. What exactly do you mean Camron? I have a good idiom, cartas nancisci, stack the cheddar/chips/paper/green/cream/dough etc.
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Postby Fredericus » Thu Jun 03, 2004 6:11 pm

<i>you see phrases like "We be flippin 'em thangs" which are more ambiguous than Latin perfect passive participles. What exactly do you mean Camron?</i>

Sticking my neck waaay out: I don't know this music at all, and don't know the context in which it appears, but one possibility would be translated into English as "We made rude gestures towards those persons."
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Postby Episcopus » Thu Jun 03, 2004 9:51 pm

It could also mean flipping pancakes for my dear mother on pancake day.
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Postby Fredericus » Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:32 pm

<i>It could also mean flipping pancakes for my dear mother on pancake day.</i>

Yes, I think that <i>would</i> be more probable in a rap song.
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Postby klewlis » Fri Jun 04, 2004 4:49 am

so... no one has any words for me?

(aside from Julia)
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Re: verba grassatorum

Postby benissimus » Fri Jun 04, 2004 5:10 am

You can use albus to refer to complexion/hair and pretty much anything on the body. Candidus would be more likely applied to beauty, personality, or fame. As for the other words... good luck!
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby auctor » Thu Jun 10, 2004 8:48 am

Latinitas Recens
http://tinyurl.com/yw2qu
has just reappeared and should go some way to providing words (or even hints for words) that would've been beyond Cicero's wildest imagination.
You've got your work cut out replicating the tribal patois of the latter-day bards though - especially if you're keeping the rhymes :D

Good luck,
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Postby blue » Thu Jun 10, 2004 2:45 pm

you could always check out swearsaurus

it won't have all of them. i don't even know if it has any of them. but it seems like a good bet for a few of those.
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Postby benissimus » Thu Jun 10, 2004 3:12 pm

Haha that is a useful tool. I know someone who will really admire "ut si!"
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Episcopus » Thu Jun 10, 2004 3:21 pm

Why do you not just invent them by making sensible compounds of existing latin words whose meanings in a rap will be easily conveyed? For such things as "do-rags" did not exist then of course!
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Postby klewlis » Thu Jun 10, 2004 7:14 pm

Episcopus wrote:Why do you not just invent them by making sensible compounds of existing latin words whose meanings in a rap will be easily conveyed? For such things as "do-rags" did not exist then of course!


Well I will do that if I have to. But why reinvent the wheel, if someone has already created the words for neolatin? :)
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Postby Episcopus » Thu Jun 10, 2004 7:37 pm

In Latin authors in poetry often twist the strict meaning of a word to fit in with the metrical scheme, who is to say that you can not follow suit? I mean the words that you will use are to be decided by you and the words that you think to best describe a "do-rag" for example :o
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