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lusorio

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lusorio

Postby phil » Mon Apr 19, 2004 8:28 pm

I looked up lusorio in my dictionary; nothing. In WORDS.EXE, it says:
=>lusorio

ori SUFFIX
-orium, -ory, -or; place where
lusori.o N 2 2 DAT S N
lusori.o N 2 2 ABL S N
lusus, lusus N M
play; game, sport; amusement; amorous sport;
ori SUFFIX
-orous, -ory; having to do with, pretaining to; tending to
lusori.o ADJ 1 1 DAT S M POS
lusori.o ADJ 1 1 DAT S N POS
lusori.o ADJ 1 1 ABL S M POS
lusori.o ADJ 1 1 ABL S N POS
ludo, ludere, lusi, lusus V
play, mock, tease, trick;

I'm none the wiser. What's all this -orium, -ory, -or then? Can anyone explain what's going on here?
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Postby Emma_85 » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:03 pm

Lusorius ('belonging to a game') is in my school dictionary, but not -ori :?
The noun lusus plus this strange suffix -ori, but I can't really help you with this ori, sorry. It seems to me that -ori is a bit like when in English we add an -ish to the end of a noun. That's the second one WORD came up with, the adjective, but now on to the first one...
I think the -orium, -ory, -or bit of this noun lusorius ('place, where you can play' ???) declination.
But I'm confused too...
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Postby benissimus » Tue Apr 20, 2004 3:00 am

I've never heard of lusorium, but the -ori- that Words is talking about is really -orium. I guess lusorium is to ludo as auditorium is to audio (add -orium to the supine stem). That doesn't necessarily mean it's a word though :P
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Postby benissimus » Tue Apr 20, 2004 3:07 am

Nevermind, I just found it in the Oxford. First two meaning are used mostly by Seneca and Pliny.

lusorius, -a, -um
1. Used in games or for amusement.
2. Used, uttered, etc., in mere sport, not serious, playful, frivolous.
3. Ineffectual, futile.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby phil » Tue Apr 20, 2004 3:46 am

Oh I think I get it now, the
-orium, -ory, -or; place where
and
-orous, -ory; having to do with, pretaining to; tending to

are English suffix equivalents. I thought they were the Latin ones, and I could not for the life of me work out how to decline a word that had endings in -orium, ory, -or.
Thank you for putting up with me.
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