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BLB, Collar & Daniell, § 27 & 28

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BLB, Collar & Daniell, § 27 & 28

Postby Barrius » Mon Apr 12, 2004 7:59 pm

From "The Beginner's Latin Book" by Collar and Daniell - can someone be so kind as to check my responses. (With exercise text so no one has to look them up).

Critics welcome. Suggestions taken. Thanks in advance.

Code: Select all
Page 10, § 27.I   (Nominative and Accusative)
 1. The roads are broad.          Viae sunt latae.
 2. The streets are long.         Viae sunt longae.
 3. Queens have doves.            Reginae columbas habent.
 4. The girl has a rose.          Puella rosam habet.
 5. Eagles have tails.            Aquilae caudas habent.
 6. The dove is white.            Columba est alba.
 7. The girl has a trumpet.       Puella tubam habet.
 8. The eagle is large.           Aquila est magna.
 9. The rose is white.            Rosa est alba.
10. The girls are small.          Puellae sunt parvae.


Page 10, § 27.II  (Nominative and Accusative)
 1. The long way is hard.                  Via longa est dura.
 2. Good girls have roses.                 Puellae bonae rosas habent.
 3. Doves have small tails.                Columbae caudas parvas habent.
 4. Great eagles have broad tails.         Aquilae magnae caudas latas habent.
 5. The good queen has a dove.             Regina bona columbam habet.
 6. The little girls have large trumpets.  Puellae parvae tubas magnas habent.
 7. The little dove is white.              Columba parva est alba.
 8. The queen is good.                     Regina est bona.
 9. The good queen has a little daughter.  Regina bona puellam parvam habet.
10. A little girl has a white rose.        Puella parva rosam albam habet.
    

Page 10, § 28   (Nominative and Accusative)
 1. Estne via lata?                  Via est lata.
 2. Habetne puella rosam?            Puella rosam habet.
 3. Habentne aquilae caudas longas?  Aquilae caudas longas habent.
 4. Quid habet regina bona?          Regina bona columbam habet.
                                     Regina bona puellam parvam habet.
 5. Quid habent puellae bonae?       Puellae bonae rosam habent.
 6. Habentne columbae caudas?        Columbae caudas habent.
Barrius
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Postby whiteoctave » Mon Apr 12, 2004 8:25 pm

columbae albae parvaeque caudas ac tubas et puellae magnae bonaeque maioris tubas ac rosas habent.
scilicet.

yes, they are all correct. i'm glad the writer indulged in such variatio!

~dave
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Postby Barrius » Tue Apr 13, 2004 12:21 am

Thank you sir, and yes, it is repetitive ;o)
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Postby Barrius » Tue Apr 13, 2004 2:45 pm

whiteoctave wrote:columbae albae parvaeque caudas ac tubas et puellae magnae bonaeque maioris tubas ac rosas habent.
scilicet.


I haven't ran across it yet (surely one exists), but is there a rule about "ac/atque", "et" and "que", and the proper usage? Does one form place more emphasis than another?
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Postby whiteoctave » Tue Apr 13, 2004 3:51 pm

the enclitic -que is the strongest binder and is primarily used to unite two semantically or syntactically close ideas, such as pairs of adjectives or the stylistic "hendiadys".
Ac=Atque, the former being used before consonants, the latter before vowels. They are the intermediary conjunctive binder and are used to unite separate aspects of a given clause.
et is the most common conjunction and is generally used to join together sequences of thought and various paratactic constructions.

This is a rather abridged description and many books on prose composition elaborate far more comprehensively and successfully. For the expression of three nouns together (that, for the sake of argument, are of equal importance), the options are as follows:

A et B et C (if they are a simple list; if one wants to give the impression of the exhaustiveness of the list, asyndeton (lack of conjunctions) can be employed, i.e. A B C)
A B-que C-que (this rather nifty version is used of three generally united nouns and is seen very often in Livy. Occasionally, L. indulges in the rather odd mix of asyndeton and -que "A B C-que". The cheek!)
A ac/atque B ac/atque C (this option is not too common as ac/atque favour linking just two things. Tacitus and Sallust tend to favour the use of ac and atque and often mix it with et/-que seemingly at random so as to achieve their beloved "variatio" of style: e.g. A ac/atque B et C; A ac/atque B C-que).
It is generally rare to see ac/atque follow an enclitic -que.

~dave
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Postby Barrius » Tue Apr 13, 2004 8:31 pm

whiteoctave wrote:the enclitic -que is the strongest binder and is primarily used to unite two semantically or syntactically close ideas, such as pairs of adjectives or the stylistic "hendiadys".
Ac=Atque, the former being used before consonants, the latter before vowels. They are the intermediary conjunctive binder and are used to unite separate aspects of a given clause.
et is the most common conjunction and is generally used to join together sequences of thought and various paratactic constructions.


You probably thought I would understand that!



Actually, I did [once I re-read it], it was perfect.


A B-que C-que (this rather nifty version is used of three generally united nouns and is seen very often in Livy. Occasionally, L. indulges in the rather odd mix of asyndeton and -que "A B C-que". The cheek!)


This method I have seen before (besides your response) and now understand! Thank YOU so very much.
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