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Passive plural or singular for lists?

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Passive plural or singular for lists?

Postby Alan Aversa » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:59 am

Why is it permissible to say, with the singular passive verb (conjunctive in this case):
Laudetur Iesus et Maria.
as opposed to with the plural verb:
Laudentur Iesus et Maria.
? Thanks
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Re: Passive plural or singular for lists?

Postby MatthaeusLatinus » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:39 am

Actually, they're both correct. The singular verb agrees with the nearest subject.
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Re: Passive plural or singular for lists?

Postby Alan Aversa » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:44 am

MatthaeusLatinus wrote:Actually, they're both correct. The singular verb agrees with the nearest subject.
Sure, but do they mean exactly the same thing?

Here's another example, with an even longer list but singular verb:
…ómnium Sanctórum universitáti sit sempitérna laus, honor, virtus et glória…
So, instead of sit I could just as easily say sint? Thanks again

See, in English there is no problem because all these passives and/or conjunctive verbs would use "be", which is still "be" for singular or plural.
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Re: Passive plural or singular for lists?

Postby Alan Aversa » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:57 am

Actually, Bennett's New Latin Grammar does have a section on verb agreement:
255. 1. Agreement in Number. With two or more subjects the verb is regularly plural; as,—

pater et fīlius mortuī sunt, the father and son died.

2. But sometimes the verb agrees with the nearest subject; viz.,—

a) When the verb precedes both subjects or stands between them; as,—

mortuus est pater et fīlius;

pater mortuus est et fīlius.

b) When the subjects are connected by aut; aut ... aut; vel ... vel; neque ... neque; as,—

neque pater neque fīlius mortuus est, neither father nor son died.

3. When the different subjects are felt together as constituting a whole, the singular is used; as,—

temeritās ignōrātiōque vitiōsa est, rashness and ignorance are bad.

a. This is regularly the case in senātus populusque Rōmānus.
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