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Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

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Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:06 am

Salvete!

I've just put online Walter Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary", a very good topical vocabulary (PDF, 90 pages, file size about 700 KB). This is the text used by Evan Millner as a basis for his "Vocabulary Building" files (however, see bottom of posting).

It can be found here.

A bit more information from the introduction:

When it comes to learning any language, mastering as quickly as possible as much as possible of the vocabulary is one of the most important tasks in store for the student. „Ay, there's the rub,“ as Hamlet says. How can you do so?
It is impossible to learn all words, the vocabulary of most languages being far too large for such a brute force approach. While it might be possible to do so for the vocabulary of a single book, it may be wiser to choose a different approach, one giving heed to the „law of diminishing returns.“
There are two ways of selectively learning the important vocabulary:

1. Using word lists derived from word frequency
2. Using a topical vocabulary

The first approach is exemplified by Paul B. Diederich's "The frequency of Latin words and their endings", in which paper he lists word frequencies for more than 4,000 words.
The second approach is also exemplified by a piece of work by Paul B. Diederich, the „Basic Vocabulary“ of about 1,500 words, attached to the aforementioned paper. These words are sorted into word types (nouns, adjectives, etc.) and further into various categories like „Gods“, „City and Buildings“, „Verbs – Mental and Sensory Operations“.
However, a far more detailed vocabulary was published by Walter Ripman as part of his „Handbook of the Latin Language“. It was used by Evan Millner, the creator of the Latinum language course, to create a set of „Vocabulary Building“ audio files. It closely follows the text. The original text, however, includes additional information useful to the student, for example concerning case constructions. I also found these audio files rather hard to digest without having first read the text itself or looking at the text while listening to the files.
Unfortunately, Ripman’s „Classified Vocabulary“ has been been unavailable online until now, which is all the more lamentable as the dictionary part of it is very good as well, as it contains many sample phrases. Therefore I decided to bring at least the „Classified Vocabulary“ to the wider public, in the hope that it may help in getting a better grasp of the Latin language.
I want to stress that this publication is in no way connected with the Latinum course – which I can heartily recommend, by the way. So, any fault lies solely with me.
I mostly stuck with the original text, making some changes to the formatting to improve its readability. The transcription – as opposed to a facsimile edition – results in a loss of (a little) part of the information contained in the original book as Mr. Ripman used a rather ideosyncratic layout which sometimes juxtaposed contrasting words.
I used the macrons as given in the original publication, so use them at your own risk. In a few cases, however, I added or removed macrons when these were obvious errata (relying on the information given in the dictionary part of the book). The most important changes made by me can be found in Appendix 2.
The abbreviations used in the text are collected in Appendix 1.


I used a text formatting that makes the text look fine when 2 pages of the file are printed on 1 side of a A4-sheet (thus 4 pages of the PDF-file fitting on 1 sheet of paper). Any copy shop should be able to print the file in a way that the resulting A4-pages can be cut in half and then form a booklet which can be bound using a ring binding. I did it for my sample copy (so that I do not have to carry around the original book), and it looks fine.

As mentioned above, this is the source for Mr. Millner's Vocabulary Building files. However, in some places the order may vary ever so slightly. This is due to the idiosyncratic layout of the original text which in some cases makes possible variant interpretations as to which sub-section follows which.

Perhaps I'll make an edition adapted to Mr. Millner's files at some later point, but don't hold your breath.

In the hope that you'll find it useful.

Carolus Raeticus
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby adrianus » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:25 am

Well done, Carolus.
Benè factum est, Carole.

Corrigendum: "scaenae servire", non "scaena servire", credo
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby brookter » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:48 am

Excellent Carole - I'm very grateful!
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:52 am

Salve Adriane!

Duly noted, correct and new PDF uploaded.

Anyone, please report any remaining errors you encounter. As far as reliability of my transcription is concerned I can assure that there should be hardly any (perhaps even no) errors left because I made a rather thorough proofreading run. But, of course, there are always one or two stragglers.

Bye,

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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby thesaurus » Fri Apr 22, 2011 5:40 pm

Excellent work!

Do you have any suggestions for how one ought to use this tool?
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby jtm » Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:08 pm

Thanks for posting that! I've been compiling my own little lists in exactly the same way. This will save me the effort. I can just add notes to this rather than starting everything from scratch.

As for how to use these lists--I started my lists because I'm interested in how and when Ovid uses certain words. If there are several words to choose from for "tree" or "log" or "wood" or whatever, is there anything significant in the choices he makes. Obviously, he'd have to consider what will fit the meter, but I'm sure he was good enough that if he wanted to use a particular word, most often he could have made it fit.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Tue Apr 26, 2011 7:20 am

Salve Thesaure!

thesaurus wrote:Do you have any suggestions for how one ought to use this tool?


In my opinion Walter Ripman's Classified Vocabulary is not intended to be used for learning completely unknown words (or at least not as the main tool for doing so). For that to be possible you would need further information like gender, type of declension/conjugation, etc. A topical dictionary more suitable for that purpose is the Lexique nouveau de la langue latine (Philippe Guisard, Christelle Laize, 2007), provided that your French is up to the task.

Instead, this Classified Vocabulary is best used to select the words for a basic vocabulary and facilitate the retension of that vocabulary by increasing the connections between the words. So, one way (not necessarily the only one) to use Walter Ripman's Classified Vocabulary would be like this:

  1. Select a section you're interested in. Note: by all means do not feel obliged to use the list in the order given by the section numbers.
  2. Read through a section (or part of one) carefully. The type of declension ought to be self-evident for most nouns, in many cases the gender as well. Optionally you can consult a dictionary proper for those words which completely baffle you morphology-wise. The amount of consultation of secondary sources depends on your intentions. If you are merely interested in reading, you can get away with less grammatical information. If you are into prose composition, however, you need a firm grasp of all the morphological details. The most important thing is: whenever you stall, ask yourself why you are stalling.
  3. [OPTIONAL] Listen to Evan Millner's corresponding Vocabulary Building file.
  4. Check your progress by walking through the list looking only at the lemmata and briefly considering whether an image or idea of its meaning springs up in your mind. Doing so without cheating overly much shouldn't be that difficult as the lemmatas' bold face makes them jut out. Also, this check should be done rather quickly, anyway. If you get stuck at any point - i.e. there's no image/idea in your mind - then you know that this entry requires more work.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 until the section's vocabulary has settled.

This is only one way to use it. Any (constructive) criticism and comment is welcome.

One thing to remember: this Classified Vocabulary is meant only as an introduction to the vocabulary. Each word has its own "hue" sometimes only slightly different from that of a similar word in Ripman's list. However, that is rather advanced information. First you have to learn the fundamental meaning, and that is what Ripman's wonderful work is about.

Vale,

Carolus Raeticus
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby thesaurus » Tue Apr 26, 2011 5:44 pm

Docte Carole,

Many thanks for your explanation. I personally am pretty comfortable with the vocabulary in the list, but I am never sure how I ought to integrate such resources into my teaching. Your recommendations will definitely be helpful for this
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Interaxus » Tue May 10, 2011 7:56 pm

Carole,

Beautiful! But here's a straggler, I believe:

"prîma nocte": "prîma" caret macrône (??) ("prîmâ nocte") ...

BTW, what IS the dative of 'macron'? :(

Cheers,
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Wed May 11, 2011 12:07 pm

Salve Interaxe!

Interaxus wrote:Beautiful! But here's a straggler, I believe:

"prîma nocte": "prîma" caret macrône (??) ("prîmâ nocte") ...


Thanks for the hint, I'll include the change in the next version I'm preparing. I'm in the midst of a second proofreading run, this time listening through Evan Millner's "Vocabulary Building" audio-files (which are based on Ripman's) while reading my own transcription of Ripman's. As it is unlikely that we make the same errors, I hope to weed out most of the remaining errors (so far only minor ones). While doing so I also pay heed to any differences in the order of the entries in his version which I intend to add as an appendix to my own one.

Valete,

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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby adrianus » Wed May 11, 2011 6:27 pm

Interaxus wrote:BTW, what IS the dative of 'macron'? :(

Substantivum, Interaxe, neutrius generis Graecum (declinationis secundae) est "makron", quod "makro" scribitur dativo casu,—non minùs ablativo, cui casui hîc "caret" verbum conjungitur, nisi confusus sum.
Makron, Greek neuter (second declension) substantive, is "makro" in the dative, Interaxus. Same for the ablative ("makro") which "caret" takes (not the dative) in this place ("istud verbum macro caret"), unless I'm mixed up.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Interaxus » Thu May 12, 2011 1:33 am

Adriane:

Thanks for unscrambling that one!

I was obviously drunk on Greek - where all ablatives ARE datives ...

In fact, I edited out my initial 'macro' after googling to 'sine macronibus' (I even found plural 'macra').

So what's the full paradigm? And what's a suitable neuter noun (other than 'macron') to use as a model?

Cheers,
Int
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby adrianus » Thu May 12, 2011 8:55 am

Interaxus wrote:So what's the full paradigm? And what's a suitable neuter noun (other than 'macron') to use as a model?

For nouns as for adjectives, I think, and A&G use neuter "Ilion" for the paradigm:
Adjectivis ut nominibus paradigma, ut credo. Apud A&G (§52) "Ilion" nomen neutrius generis datur:
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0001%3Asmythp%3D52
Ut latiné genetivo/dativo/ablativo: -on -on -on -i -o -o (singulariter, etiam pluraliter sicut latinè omnibus casibus)
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby adrianus » Thu May 12, 2011 6:41 pm

I found this. For macron, Nicolaus Wollick (1512) gives "macra" as a first declension substantive/adjective, because it qualifies "virgula" (it seems to me).
Hoc inveni. Nomen macrae primae declinationis scribit Wollicus (1512), ut mihi videtur, quod adjectivum (vel substantivum, si velis) virgulae conjungatur.

Enchiridion musices Nicolai Wollici Barroducensis (anno millesimo quingentesimo duodecimo proditum), in libro quarto (http://www.chmtl.indiana.edu/tml/16th/WOLENC4_TEXT.html) scribitur // he wrote:Macra autem longa extat virgula iacens hac forma. qua greci vtuntur ad cognoscendam syllabam longam.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby ingrid70 » Thu May 12, 2011 7:50 pm

What a pity. I would have liked to use macaroni :-).

Ingrid
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby adrianus » Fri May 13, 2011 10:48 am

Don't be sad, Ingrid. You could put a feather in your hat instead, and call that macaroni. Or mix English or Dutch with Latin and call that macaronic. :)

Non tristis esto, Ingrida. Magìs pennam in petasum defige et eum macaroneum galerum esse dic. Vel Latinum et Anglicum (aut Batavicum) misce, quod macaronicum vocare potes.

http://www.archive.org/details/ferculamacaronic00schauoft, pagina sexta, wrote:Ars poetica macaronica a macaronibus derivata, qui macarones sunt quoddam pulmentum farina caseo botiro compaginatum, grossum rude et rusticanum: ideo macaronices nil nisi grassedinem ruditatem et vocabulazzos debet in se continere.' Merlini Cocaii Apologetica in sui excusationem, in der Ausgabe Venetiis ap. Bevilacquam 1613 pag. 19 fg.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Wed Aug 31, 2011 12:59 pm

Salvete!

I finally finished the 2nd proofreading run of Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary". The errors (rather many) encountered and removed can be found at the end of this posting. This 2nd edition represents the final version of my transcription. Most mistakes (either those made by me during the transcription or those present in the book itself) should have been dealt with. So, you are welcome to enjoy this final edition.

The file can be downloaded here.

Valete,

Carolus Raeticus


---------------------------------------

Changes applied after 2nd proof-reading run:

Types of changes:

F = formatting (missing bold typeface, adding missing space, semicolon, etc.)
L = error in Latin text
E = error in English text
M = move entire entry

1.1 -> F: dîlûculum -> adding bold typeface
1.1 -> L: prîma nocte -> prîmâ nocte
1.1 -> F: vigilia,quarter -> adding missing space
1.1 -> F: cottîdiânus -> adding bold typeface
1.3 -> F: postrêmô, lastly -> adding missing semicolon after "lastly"
2.3 -> F: festînâtô -> removing superfluous point
3.3 -> L: finis -> fînis
3.3 -> E: bring to and end -> bring to an end
4.1 -> L: adding missing comma between "mundus" and "terrae"
4.4 -> E: drage -> drag
5.1 -> F: change formatting of section title "towards" to be the same as "away from"
5.1 -> L: usque ad -> ûsque ad
5.1 -> F: tendere -> changed typeface of "Venusiam"
5.1 -> E: illinc, istinc...: "from that placd" -> "from that place"
5.1 -> E: dêtrûdere: "thrust off" -> "thrust away"
5.2 -> F: change formatting of section title "in" to be the same as "out"
5.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "into" to be the same as "out of"
5.3 -> E: irrêpere: "creep or steal into" -> "creep or steal in"
5.3 -> F: irruptiô -> adding bold typeface
5.3 -> E: înfîgere: "thrust into" -> "thrust in"
5.4 -> F: change formatting of section title "up and high" to be the same as "down and low"
5.5 -> F: change formatting of section title "through" to be the same as "across"
5.7 -> E: dextrôrsum: "to right" -> "to the right"
5.8 -> L: adversus, contrârius: "in contrâriâs partes" -> "in contrâriâs partês"
5.9 -> F: change formatting of section title "on, over" to be the same as "under"
6.1 -> F: change formatting of section title "near" to be the same as "far"
6.1 -> L: quousque? -> quoûsque?
6.1 -> E: abesse: "be absend" -> "be absent"
6.2 -> F: change formatting of section title "before..." to be the same as "behind..."
6.2 -> L: major changes in entry "praeîre..." (due to mix up with missing entry - see next)
6.2 -> L: insert missing entry "praecurrere" after "praeîre"
6.2 -> F: tergum: adding comma in "back rear"
6.2 -> L: insert missing entry "rêicere" after "revolvere"
6.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "together" to be the same as "apart"
7.3 -> L: "ex loco superîore" -> "ex locô superiôre"
7.3 -> F: aequus: adding missing comma between "aequum" and "plânum"
7.6 -> L: equô citâtô: admisso -> admissô
8.1 -> F: fertilis: removing faulty comma between "frûgibus" and "fêtus"
8.5 -> L: sagina -> sagîna
8.5 -> L: pâstor: pâstôricus -> pâstôricius
9.2 -> L: flûmen: adding missing entry for adjective "flûmineus"
9.4 -> F: nauta: poeta -> poet.
9.6 -> F: change formatting of section title "clean, pure" to be the same as "unclean soil"
10 -> L: cometês -> comêtês
10 -> L: crînîs -> crînis
10 -> E: môtûs stêllârum: observe the moments -> observe the movements
12.1 -> L: sênsus: "ea quae subiectae..." -> "ea quae subiecta..."
13.2 -> E: fistula: "red pipe" -> "reed pipe"
14 -> F: prôspicere: changed formatting of "or" between "longê" and "multum"
14.2 -> F: change formatting of section title "in sight..." to be the same as "out of sight..."
14.2 -> L: major change in entry "in medium venîre" (2x "prôcêdere")
14.2 -> L: scaena servîre -> scaenae servîre
14.2 -> F: invenîre: adding missing space after "inventiô,"
14.2 -> L: âmîttere -> âmittere
14.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "beautiful..." to be the same as "ugly"
15 -> E: calor: throw thoroughly hot -> grow thoroughly hot
16 -> L: lûmen: lux -> lûx
17.6 -> E: ex parte: "inpart" -> "in part"
17.92 -> F: recênsêre: change typeface of "mîlitês"
22.1 -> L: truncus: "ramus" -> "râmus"
22.6 -> L: lens -> lêns
26.2 -> L: faciês: "os" -> "ôs"
26.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "trunk, limbs" to be the same as the rest
26.3 -> L: venter: "abdomen" -> "abdômen"
26.3 -> L: "prôtere" -> "prôterere"
26.5 -> F: add missing semi-colon between "saucîre" and "cônfectus"
27.1 -> E: sêricus: "stuffs" -> "silks"
28.2 -> F: pômêrium: removing superfluous dot after "building"
29.1 -> F: add missing space between "cottage," and "hut"
30.3 -> F: change typeface of "dê senâtû movêre, senâtû prohibêre"
30.4 -> L: aedîlis: "aedîlicus" -> "aedîlicius"
30.8 -> M: move entries "tribûtum - agrôs lîberâre" after "portôrium"
31.2 -> E: antistes: "hight priest(ess)" -> "high pries(ess)"
32.1 -> L: sors: "sortîtiô" -> "sortîtô"
32.1 -> L: sors: "sortîtîô" -> "sortîtiô"
32.1 -> E: sîc placitum: "dispension" -> "dispensation"
33.1 -> L: propius -> proprius
33.1 -> E: vectîgal: "from estate" -> "from estates"
33.5 -> M: move entries "damnum - frûctus" after "auctiô"
33.5 -> L: "frûctus industriae perdere" -> "frûctûs..."
33.6 -> E: testâmentum: "substitue" -> "substitute"
33.7 -> F: change formatting of section title "slavery" to be the same as new section "freedom"
33.7 -> F: create sub-section "freedom" (not in original book, but makes sense)
33.7 -> M: move entries "in servitium - diârium" after "sub corônâ"
34.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "order" to be the same as "forbid"
34.3 -> L: êdicere -> êdîcere
34.4 -> F: change formatting of section title "give" to be the same as "thanks"
34.5 -> F: change formatting of section title "please" to be the same as "thank you"
35.5 -> F: partês: insert missing space between "partês," and "character"
35.5 -> L: tripudium: "tripudâre" -> "tripudiâre"
36 -> L: instrûmentum -> înstrûmentum
37.1 -> L: in orbem cônsistere: "orem facere" -> "orbem facere"
37.2 -> F: "recênsêre": add missing space between "recôgnôscere," and "review"
37.3 -> F: "stipendium": add missing space between "stipendium," and "pay"
37.4 -> L: lôrica -> lôrîca
37.4 -> L: insert missing entry "sagittârius" after "arcus"
37.61 -> F: change formatting of section title "war" to be the same as "peace"
37.61 -> F: indûtiae -> add 3 times abbreviation point after "i" (for "indûtiâs")
37.67 -> F: change formatting of section title "victory" to be the same as "surrender"
37.67 -> L: dêtrimentum -> dêtrîmentum
37.67 -> M: move entries "capere - sub corônâ" after "in officiô continêre"
37.7 -> L: custôdia -> cûstôdia
37.7 -> E: moenia: "stations sentinels" -> "station sentinels"
37.8 -> L: obsîdêre -> obsidêre
38.3 -> F: change formatting of section title "strong, firm" to be the same as "weak, fickle"
38.4 -> F: change formatting of section title "faithful" to be the same as "faithless"
38.4 -> E: pius: "faithful" -> "dutiful"
38.5 -> F: change formatting of section title "strength..." to be the same as "weakness..."
38.6 -> F: change formatting of section title "modesty" to be the same as "pride..."
38.7 -> F: change formatting of section title "prudence..." to be the same as "rashness..."
38.7 -> L: sensus commûnis -> sênsus commûnis
38.8 -> F: change formatting of section title "pleasant..." to be the same as "severe..."
38.8 -> E: added gramm. note "adj./ (not included in original) to differentiate between use of "kindly" as an adjective and an adverb
38.9 -> F: change formatting of section title "generous..." to be the same as "stingy..."
39.6 -> L: "spissim opus" -> "spissum opus"
39.8 -> L: remissus: "paulô remissus" -> "paulô remissius"
40.42 -> F: change formatting of section title "opinion" to be the same as "error"
40.43 -> F: change formatting of section title "know..." to be the same as "clear"
40.43 -> L: liquet: "manîfestum eset" -> "manifêstum est"
40.44 -> F: add missing point between "anceps," and "doubtful"
40.52 -> F: change typeface of "industriae"
40.62 -> L: adding missing section 40.62 ("without plan", 5 entries)
40.63 -> E: avê: "meeing" -> "meeting"
41.72 -> L: tê damno -> tê damnô
42.2 -> E: modus: "rhythm, cadence" -> "rhythm, harmony"
42.2 -> L: adding missing entry "numerus" between "modus" and "poêta"
44.2 -> E: plôrâre: "depore" -> "deplore"
44.2 -> L: molestus: "sine molestîa tuâ" -> "sine molestiâ tuâ"
45.1 -> L: rogâtiô: add "r." (for "rogâtiônem") before several examples
46.5 -> E: number of section "hindrance" wrong (45.5 -> 46.5)
47.6 -> F: remove superfluous comma after "condemnat"

Errors in Original:

3.3 -> L: finis -> fînis
5.8 -> L: adversus, contrârius: "in contrâriâs partes" -> "in contrâriâs partês"
6.1 -> L: quousque? -> quoûsque?
10 -> L: crînîs -> crînis
14.2 -> L: âmîttere -> âmittere
22.6 -> L: lens -> lêns
36 -> L: instrûmentum -> înstrûmentum
37.7 -> L: custôdia -> cûstôdia
38.7 -> L: sensus commûnis -> sênsus commûnis
33.5 -> L: "frûctus industriae perdere" -> "frûctûs..."
Carolus Raeticus
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Re: Ripman's "Classified Vocabulary" finally online

Postby Carolus Raeticus » Wed Aug 31, 2011 1:06 pm

Salvete!

I just uploaded the (P)LATINUM-edition of my transcription of Walter Ripman's Classified Vocabulary. As an explanation an excerpt from the introduction:

This version of the transcription of Walter Ripman’s „Classified Vocabulary“ has been especially
adapted to fit the order used in Evan Millner’s „Swallowing the Dictionary“ audio files based on the
same book and which are part of his LATINUM audio course. The most important mistakes in these
audio files are marked in the text by a [icon] preceding the respective lemma. These mistakes are also
listed in Appendix 3. They may seem to be many, but judging from the many errors I made during
transcription and considering the difficulty of making an oral version based on Ripman’s book with its
idiosyncrasies, I can assure you that his performance is admirable.
This adaptation is based on the audio files as bought in May 2010.


The (P)LATINUM-edition can be downloaded here

Should you use Mr. Millner's vocabulary files based on the "Classified Vocabulary", this is the version you'll want. I was able to locate the following mistakes in his audio files:

1.1 „ante meridiem“: false translation „in the afternon“
1.1 „antemeridianus“: false translation „noon (adj.)“
1.6 „abhinc quattuor annos“: Evan gives the example "annos tribus diebus" instead of the correct
"a[bhinc] tribus diebus"
1.7 „mora“: Evan says „nullam moram interponēre (!) quin“ as if „interponere“ were a verb of
the second conjugation.
2.4 „quot annos natus es?“: Evan gives the example "annos XXX natus vixi" instead of "annos
XXX vixi".
2.5 "obsolescere": Evans says "obolescere" instead of "obsolescere"
3.1 „initium“: Evan translates "creatio" as creator which is not correct.
3.6 „mors“: "mortalitas" translated as death (noun) instead of "being subject to death (noun)"
3.6 "mortem oppetere": Evan says "opertere" instead of "oppetere"
3.6 English word "obsequies" treated and pronounced as if it were a Latin one
5.1 "accedere": Evan says "aditum" and translates it as "an approach". However, "aditum" is
only part of the sample sentence "aditum DPN ad ACTG intercludere".
6.1 "abesse": Evan doesn't render the example "longe a." as "longe abesse" but simply as "longe
a."
6.1 "obtendere": pronounced as "obstendere"
7.4 "pulvis": adjective "pulverulentus" pronounced as "pulverentulus"
8.1 "agricola": "colonus" pronounced as "colona"
8.3 "bos": Evan pronounces "bovillus" and "iuvencus" together as if both mean "bullock, ox".
However, "bovillus" is an adjective like "boarius". Only "iuvencus" means "bullock, ox".
9.2 "flumen": Evan gives the example "pedibus f. transire" as "pedibus flumine transire".
However, it should be "pedibus flumen transire" as can be seen from Ripman's dictionary
entry "pes".
9.5 "navem demergere": Evan says "se mergi" instead of simply "mergi".
12.1 "hebes": "hebere" translated as "to blunten" instead of "to be blunt".
12.1 "sensus": Evan says "ea quae subiectae sunt sensibus". It should be "ea quae subiecta sunt
sensibus" (this is an error in the original text).
14.1 "spectare": Evan gives the example "praebere spectaculo". It should be „spectaculum
praebere“ or "spectaculum (or spectaculo) esse" instead.
17.92 "recensere": pronounced as if it were a verb of the 3rd conjugation. It's a 2nd-conj. verb
("recênsêre").
25.5 "hospes": Evan gives the example "hospitalis facere". It should be "hospitium facere"
instead.
26.3 "vestigium": example "vestigia persequi" translated as "follow in front of". It should be
"follow in footsteps of".
26.5 "ulcus": Evan gives a third Latin lemma "ulcer". This does not exist but instead is the
English meaning "ulcer" of "ulcus" and "vomica".
29.9 "dormitum": Evan says "ad quietum ire" instead of "ad quietem ire". Also it is meant
"dormitum ire" and "cubitum ire".
30.4 "consul": "consulatu fungi" translated as "resign the consulship". It means "act as consul".
30.6 "caput": Evan gives the example "capite se deminui" instead of "capite deminui".
32.1 "accidere": Evan gives three Latin expressions for "I happened to be present" ("accidit",
"evenit", and "ut adessem"). However, there are only two: "accidit ut adessem" and "evenit
ut adessem".
33.1 "res familiaris": Evan pronounces "neglegere" is as if it were a verb of the 2rd conjugation.
It's a 3nd-conj. verb.
33.5 "pecuniam": Evan says "pecuniam in aliquae emptione consumere". It should be "pecuniam
in alicuius emptione consumere".
37.1 "agmen": Evan gives "agmen novissimi" as another variant of "rearguard". It should be
"novissimi" only, however.
37.1 "armaturae": Evan gives the lemma "armaturas" (an error in the book itself). It should be
"armaturae" instead.
37.3 "miles": Evan gives the example "manipularis legionarius" instead of "miles legionarius".
37.3 "militiae": pronounced as "militae"
37.61 "obses": Evan gives the examples "obses inter se dare", "obses accipere", "obses hostibus
imponere". It should be "obsides" instead.
37.63 "proelium": Evan adds "congressus" before the lemmas "proelium, bello, ferro, armis".
"congressus" belongs to the previous entry, however, not to this one.
37.66 "salvus": "incolumis" pronounced like "incolumnis".
37.7 "castra": Evan gives the example "locum ad castris idoneum deligere". It should be "locum
castris idoneum deligere" instead.
37.7 "muros (cuniculo) subruere": Evan gives "muras" instead of "muros".
38.1 "animi pravitas": pronounced as "animi privatas"
38.3 "obstinatus": pronounced as "obstantinus"
38.8 "mitis": Evan gives the translations "gentle, kind". It should be "gentle, mild" instead.
39.2 "subsiciva tempora": pronounced as "subsciva tempora"
40.13 "veterator": pronounced as "venerator"
40.31 "vir doctus": pronounced as "vir ductus"
40.44 "forte": "forsitan" pronounced as "fortisan"
40.45 "venit mihi in mentem": pronounced as "venit mihi in mentum"
40.51 "ratio": "ratiuncula" pronounced as "ratinuncula"
41.21 "contionari": Evan translates it as "a harangue, an address". It is a verb, however, not a noun.
41.61 "suadere": Evan translates "fratri illud persuasit" as "I am convinced" like the next two
examples, which do not belong to the first one, however.
41.61 "hortari": "hortator" and "adhortator" translated as "inciting" (noun). Both signify "one who
exhorts, an inciter, encourager".
41.62 "de sententia movere": Evan says "a propositio flectere" instead of "a proposito flectere".
41.91 "propositum": Evan says "a propositio aberrare/egredi" instead of "a proposito
aberrare/egredi".
43.3 "argumentum": Evan gives the example "argumentum adduce". "adduce" is not Latin,
however, but is the English word.
44.1 "gaudium": the meaning "signs of joy" belongs to the plural "gaudia" not to "gaudium".
44.6 "invidere": Evan says "invidium subire" instead of "invidiam subire".
44.8 "metum levare": Evan says "a metu resirare" instead of "a metu respirare".
44.8 "terror": Evan says "incidit terrorem exercitui". It should be "incidit terror exercitui".
45.1 "iure": Evan says "iniure" instead of "iure".
46.4 "fidem sequi": "fidem alicui sequi" said instead of "fidem alicuius sequi" and "in fide alicui
esse" instead of "in fide alicuius esse".
47.4 "strategemate percutere": Evan says "percutēre", as if it were of the 2nd conjugation. It
belong to the 3rd, however.
47.4 "illicere": Evan pronounces "allure" as if it were a Latin word. It is not.
47.6 "supplicium": Evan says "supplicium sumere de aliquem" instead of "supplicium sumere de
aliquo" (error in the book itself).
48.33 "per transigere": Evan says "per aliquem transigere" instead of "aliquid per aliquem
transigere".
48.4 "exemplar": For the sample phrase "exemplum afferre" Evan gives the translation "select an
example". It should be "adduce an example" instead. Also, Evan says "adduce exemplum" as
if it were a phrase in Latin". It isn't. The entry in the book read „adduce e.“ and is English.

-----------------

Valete,

Carolus Raeticus
Carolus Raeticus
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Posts: 225
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:46 am


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