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ingeniō prūdentia

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ingeniō prūdentia

Postby phil » Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:22 am

In a summary of Fabius's character:

Cautior quam prōmptior habitus est, sed īnsita eius ingeniō prūdentia eī bellō, quod tum gerēbātur, propriē apta erat.

He was regarded as a bit cautious rather than hasty, but his innate wisdom, as regards talent, was more properly suited during the war which was then being waged.

My problem is with ingeniō. It makes sense without it - 'his innate wisdom was more properly suited...' but this ingenio, which I assume is ablative of characteristic seems out of place, trapped between īnsita and prūdentia. Does it mean that his wisdom, or good sense had a character of its own?

Cheers, Phil
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Re: ingeniō prūdentia

Postby thesaurus » Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:54 am

phil wrote:In a summary of Fabius's character:

Cautior quam prōmptior habitus est, sed īnsita eius ingeniō prūdentia eī bellō, quod tum gerēbātur, propriē apta erat.

He was regarded as a bit cautious rather than hasty, but his innate wisdom, as regards talent, was more properly suited during the war which was then being waged.

My problem is with ingeniō. It makes sense without it - 'his innate wisdom was more properly suited...' but this ingenio, which I assume is ablative of characteristic seems out of place, trapped between īnsita and prūdentia. Does it mean that his wisdom, or good sense had a character of its own?

Cheers, Phil


Someone with a better knowledge of Roman civilization and mindsets could better field this, but I believe his "ingenium" is his natural character or temper, and his "good sense" is part of--an aspect of--his natural character. Perhaps you could translate it as "his deep rooted wisdom" or simply "his natural prudence"?
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: ingeniō prūdentia

Postby adrianus » Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:11 am

phil wrote:but his innate wisdom, as regards talent, was more properly suited during the war

"ingenio" is dative because attached to this// dativo casu est quia ad hoc adjungitur: "insita // grafted to/inserted into/mingled with" + dat
Ità puto:
"but the prudence associated with that man's [or just // vel etiam "his"] character was particularly suited to the very war which was then being waged"
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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