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Sentence Translation Help

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Sentence Translation Help

Postby mountaindew » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:02 am

This is the original Sentence:

Ambulabam per mediam urbem levia mecum cogitans, ut meus est mos. Te in foro stantem cum femina vidi.

This is what I have so far:

I easily walked through the middle of the city thinking with me, with my he is mine. You in (foro) leading) with the woman (visi).

I think I have the first sentence mostly right- but I have no idea what to do with foro or visi. Any help would be greatly appreciated...as I'm trying to this myself but do need a little help from the experts!
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Re: Sentence Translation Help

Postby thesaurus » Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:16 pm

mountaindew wrote:This is the original Sentence:

Ambulabam per mediam urbem levia mecum cogitans, ut meus est mos. Te in foro stantem cum femina vidi.

This is what I have so far:

I easily walked through the middle of the city thinking with me, with my he is mine. You in (foro) leading) with the woman (visi).

I think I have the first sentence mostly right- but I have no idea what to do with foro or visi. Any help would be greatly appreciated...as I'm trying to this myself but do need a little help from the experts!


"I was walking through the middle of the city, thinking some trifling thoughts to myself, as is my habit. I saw you in the forum standing with a woman."

I believe "levia" is being used in the abstract here, substantively, which is often the case with plural, neuter adjectives. "Mecum" is a way of saying "with myself," i.e. "to myself." "ut meus est mos." "ut" is here the adverb "as." "mos" is habit/custom. Te stantem goes together, "you standing," to form the whole object of the verb, "I saw/vidi," which is the first person perfect of "vido."
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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