Textkit Logo

Yet more Pliny!

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

Yet more Pliny!

Postby Einhard » Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:31 pm

Salvete,

I've a few questions about some translations of Pliny that I've done. First off, there's this:

Sub dio rursus quamquam levium exesorumque pumicum casus metuebatur 6.16

I've gone for: And yet back under the open sky, the fall of the light and corrosive pumice was feared.

Then we have the following line, quam tamen faces multae variaque lumina solabantur, which is relatively straightforward except that "lumen" is masculine and yet has a neuter ending, which "varia" presumably agrees with. Can "lumen" be of two genders?

Moving along, Deinde flammae flammarumque praenuntius, odor sulpuris, alios in fugam vertunt, excitant illum, is again relatively simple except that plural verbs are in agreement with a singular noun. I presume though that they are agreeing with the sense of "fires and flame", rather than with "odor sulpuris" in a strict sense.

I'll finish with a question on translation:

Unum adiciam, omnia me, quibus interfueram, quaeque statim, cum maxime vera memorantur, audieram, persecutum

One thing I shall add, that I have set forth all things which I was present at/privy to, immediately, when recollections are spoken with greatest clarity, I had listened.

And now my temporary obsession with Pliny is at an end! Anyone have any idea how difficult Pliny is considered to be relative to other Classical Latin writers?
User avatar
Einhard
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:05 pm
Location: Hibernia

Re: Yet more Pliny!

Postby rkday » Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:45 pm

On lumen - all three sources I've checked (Wheelock, Whitaker's Words, L&S) give it as neuter, following the pattern for 3rd decl nouns ending in -men (c.f carmen and nomen), so there's no issue there, surely.
rkday
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2010 8:23 pm

Re: Yet more Pliny!

Postby Imber Ranae » Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:57 pm

Einhard wrote:Salvete,

I've a few questions about some translations of Pliny that I've done. First off, there's this:

Sub dio rursus quamquam levium exesorumque pumicum casus metuebatur 6.16

I've gone for: And yet back under the open sky, the fall of the light and corrosive pumice was feared.


One correction: exesorum is a perfect passive participle, so it literally means "eaten through" rather than "corrosive". He's referring to the porousness of pumice stones.

I think quamquam modifies the two adjectives it precedes, rather than the whole clause, i.e. "Back under the open sky, the falling of pumice stones, though light and porous, was [still] feared." It's usually only at the beginning of sentences that quamquam means "and yet".

Einhard wrote:Then we have the following line, quam tamen faces multae variaque lumina solabantur, which is relatively straightforward except that "lumen" is masculine and yet has a neuter ending, which "varia" presumably agrees with. Can "lumen" be of two genders?


Lumen is always neuter.

Einhard wrote:Moving along, Deinde flammae flammarumque praenuntius, odor sulpuris, alios in fugam vertunt, excitant illum, is again relatively simple except that plural verbs are in agreement with a singular noun. I presume though that they are agreeing with the sense of "fires and flame", rather than with "odor sulpuris" in a strict sense.


The two subjects are "flames" and "the precursor of flames". Odor sulpuris is in apposition to the latter.

Einhard wrote:I'll finish with a question on translation:

Unum adiciam, omnia me, quibus interfueram, quaeque statim, cum maxime vera memorantur, audieram, persecutum

One thing I shall add, that I have set forth all things which I was present at/privy to, immediately, when recollections are spoken with greatest clarity, I had listened.


...quaeque statim, cum maxime vera memorantur, audieram... = "and which I had heard immediately, when things are recounted most truly (lit. when the truest things are recounted)."

And now my temporary obsession with Pliny is at an end! Anyone have any idea how difficult Pliny is considered to be relative to other Classical Latin writers?


Some are easier, some a lot harder.
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
Imber Ranae
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 5:06 am

Re: Yet more Pliny!

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:10 am

cum maxime vera memorantur = when the facts are best remembered
...that I set forth/took down everything I had been in the midst of, whatever I had heard, immediately, when the facts are best remembered.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3270
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 9:45 pm


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Exabot [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot] and 20 guests