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Even more Lingua Latina

Postby Einhard » Sat Mar 06, 2010 8:24 pm

Salvete iterum,

Just another few lines from Cap II, Roma Aeterna that I'm having a little trouble with:

...ut se arment et strictis gladiis in media hostem arma morituri se praecipitent:

Una salus victis: nullam sperare salutem


...so that arming themselves and with swords drawn they, going to die [soon to die?], threw themselves into the middle of the enemy:

One safety having been conquered: no safety to hope for


In the second line, I know "victis" doesn't agree with "una salus" but that's the best I can come up with at the moment.

"Vos quibus inegrae sunt vires" ait, "vos capite fugam"

I can't quite figure this out. Initiially I had thought something along the lines of "You for whom men are virtuous" but "integrae" wouldn't agree adjectively.

Si tibi certum est Troiae periturae te tuosque addere, patet ianua morti

Ok, the latter part is "The door is open to death". Not so sure about the first part.

If it is certain to you that you and your [?] are adding to the dying Troy

Again, tis not very satisfactory but it's all I've got.

Ita per tenebras vadunt, et Aeneam, quem dudum neque tela neque agmen Graecorum commovebat, nunc omnis aura, omnis sonus terret, cum pariter filio atrrique timeat

Thus they made their way through the darkness, and every light wind, every sound frightened Aeneas, who provoked neither the spears nor the army of the Greeks, since he feared for his son and for his father

illic regnum tibi paratum est et regia coniunx

there a kingdom has been provided for you and a regal bride

And last but not least:

Haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem
dicere deseruit, tenuesque recessit in auras


When she had said these words, she forsook the crying and many wishing [man] [to say?], and departed into the clear airs

That's it anyway. Thanks in advance for the suggestions.
I'm not sure where "dicere" fits into this sentence.
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Re: Even more Lingua Latina

Postby Imber Ranae » Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:18 pm

Einhard wrote:Salvete iterum,

Just another few lines from Cap II, Roma Aeterna that I'm having a little trouble with:

...ut se arment et strictis gladiis in media hostem arma morituri se praecipitent:

Una salus victis: nullam sperare salutem


...so that arming themselves and with swords drawn they, going to die [soon to die?], threw themselves into the middle of the enemy:


Shouldn't that be in media hostium arma "into the midst of the enemy's arms"? You can translate the future participle with an infinitive of purpose: "threw themselves into [etc.] to die." More literally "expecting to die".

One safety having been conquered: no safety to hope for

In the second line, I know "victis" doesn't agree with "una salus" but that's the best I can come up with at the moment


Victis is being used as a substantive here: "those having been conquered", i.e. "the vanquished". The infinitive phrase at the end is substantival and in apposition with salus in the first part: "There is [only] one deliverance for the vanquished: to expect no deliverance."

"Vos quibus inegrae sunt vires" ait, "vos capite fugam"

I can't quite figure this out. Initiially I had thought something along the lines of "You for whom men are virtuous" but "integrae" wouldn't agree adjectively.


Integrae modifies vires. Quibus is dative of possession with sunt: "You who have unworn strength." Capite fugam is a command: "take flight".

Si tibi certum est Troiae periturae te tuosque addere, patet ianua morti

Ok, the latter part is "The door is open to death". Not so sure about the first part.

If it is certain to you that you and your [?] are adding to the dying Troy

Again, tis not very satisfactory but it's all I've got.


This must be adapted from the Aeneid. Si tibi certum est + infinitive = "If you are resolved to". Addere + acc. + dat. = "to involve [someone] in [something]".

"If you are resolved to involve yourself and your men in soon-to-be-destroyed Troy, the door to death lies open."

Ita per tenebras vadunt, et Aeneam, quem dudum neque tela neque agmen Graecorum commovebat, nunc omnis aura, omnis sonus terret, cum pariter filio atrrique timeat

Thus they made their way through the darkness, and every light wind, every sound frightened Aeneas, who provoked neither the spears nor the army of the Greeks, since he feared for his son and for his father


Commovebat probably means something like "stirred" or "roused". You swapped its grammatical subject and object, however. The subjects are tela and agmen, although the verb agrees only with the latter, which might have thrown you off. The direct object is quem, with Aeneas being its antecedent. You also missed pariter "equally" at the end.

illic regnum tibi paratum est et regia coniunx

there a kingdom has been provided for you and a regal bride


Looks good. You could also translate it "is prepared for you".

And last but not least:

Haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem
dicere deseruit, tenuesque recessit in auras


When she had said these words, she forsook the crying and many wishing [man] [to say?], and departed into the clear airs

That's it anyway. Thanks in advance for the suggestions.
I'm not sure where "dicere" fits into this sentence.


Dicere must be an objective infinitive with volentem: "wishing to speak many [words]". The subject of dedit is Aeneas, I'm assuming, and lacrimantem/volentem is probably his wife Creusa. Tenues...auras is more like "light breezes".
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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Re: Even more Lingua Latina

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 07, 2010 12:29 am

Imber Ranae wrote:Tenues...auras is more like "light breezes".

auras (pl) = "air"
I'd say // Dicam hoc: "As soon as she uttered these words, she left him crying and wanting to say many things, and disappeared into thin air."
Aliter, anglicè "those going to die" vel "about to die" pro "morituri" et "quarter" pro "salutem".
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Even more Lingua Latina

Postby Imber Ranae » Sun Mar 07, 2010 2:26 am

Seems I had the two mixed up. Impossible to tell without checking the context, which I failed to do.
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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