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Which method do you like?

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Which method do you like?

Postby nathanj5 » Fri Dec 12, 2003 5:30 pm

Hi all - just been having a look at the two beginner's latin books available here at textkit. I have some other texts myself too, mostly old Spanish textbooks which I actually like becuase I like moving from latin to spanish but i also want to use an english manual. I was wondering which book people prefer between the d'ooge and the collar and grant.

I like the idea of reading caesar but also want the better method .

What do people think?

Thanks in advance,

Nathan
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Postby benissimus » Fri Dec 12, 2003 11:31 pm

Hi 8)

From what I have seen of both of the books, they both seem equally good. They do have a different balance of exercises; D'Ooge has more reading material and C&D has more sentence translation exercises. If you plan on using the Textkit community as a resource, then I would definitely recommend you use D'Ooge, as most of the learners here are and I believe a key to the exercises is being compiled (slowly but surely). Another advantage to D'Ooge is that you will be more familiar with his style if you choose to use our Cicero Orations also by D'Ooge.
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thanks benissimus

Postby nathanj5 » Sat Dec 13, 2003 12:25 am

Cool thanks benissimus - :)

I have to sway I was initially drawn to the d'ooge because there does seem to be wealth of material to read, much more what i'm looking for. I've decided to go back to latin and start greek basically to get to grips with writers that i've always wanted to cover and not just create lots of - the cowardly soldiers brought geraniums to the general's daughter's wedding (though there is a part of me that relishes such nonsense :o )

I know that it's said that nonsense sentences help to pay attention to the cases etc. but it's also nice to get stuck into 'proper stuff' - gives you a sense of progress.

Thanks again.

Nathan
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Postby Episcopus » Sat Dec 13, 2003 11:47 am

:shock: Let's be frank here. D'Ooge beats the living participle out of that other guy.
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Postby benissimus » Sat Dec 13, 2003 3:07 pm

yeah yeah...
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Postby Episcopus » Sat Dec 13, 2003 4:00 pm

benissimus wrote:yeah yeah...


:evil: You're just denying something so evident that I may be annoyed.
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Postby klewlis » Sat Dec 13, 2003 7:33 pm

Episcopus wrote:
benissimus wrote:yeah yeah...


:evil: You're just denying something so evident that I may be annoyed.


lol. He is denying nothing, Episcope! And if he were denying something, it would be your *opinion*, and not some absolute universal truth. ;)
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Postby Episcopus » Sun Dec 14, 2003 5:29 pm

Remember that when I came to textkit unbiased I looked at all Latin grammars here and there was only one with clear explanations a steady pace and good exercises with vocabulary. No really it is obvious which is better.
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Postby tdominus » Mon Dec 15, 2003 1:42 am

It may be inherently better for you, but it requires a small leap of logic to say it's better for every human being on earth. ;)

I like D'ooge too. I have "teach yourself latin" but I find the lack of english->latin exercises to be too great of an omission. I don't understand why such things aren't encouraged these days. For me at least, translating into latin really helps with my understanding and memorisation of grammar and vocabulary.
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Postby benissimus » Mon Dec 15, 2003 5:40 am

That's all you really need in my opinion. Everyone is going for the story approach to try to ensnare more Latin learners when all they really need to do is make it more engaging... oh well [/rant]
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Postby tdominus » Mon Dec 15, 2003 7:06 am

Yeah, the popular method these days seems to be more about short term ease rather than aquiring mastery of the language.
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Postby Episcopus » Mon Dec 15, 2003 3:13 pm

There are hundreds of English --> Latin Questions.
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