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Gerunds and Present Participles

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Gerunds and Present Participles

Postby Episcopus » Thu Dec 11, 2003 8:07 pm

Am I right in saying that the present participle is the adjective and gerund is the noun? The -ing forms are totally different.

And what is what I just said in Latin :?

Thanks :)
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Postby Episcopus » Fri Dec 12, 2003 1:50 pm

Can gerundives be plural adjectives? If not Whyever not? I realise that the gerundive used in the gerund-adjective way is the corresponding adjective, but D'Ooge hasn't clearly told me what the difference between the uses of the present participle and gerundive...It's a bit confusing, not hard...but things aren't clear...help
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Postby Emma_85 » Fri Dec 12, 2003 5:14 pm

The Gerundivum is an adjective derived from a verb, and has a passive meaning. You can have it in singular or pluaral and in all cases (a or o declension). There are different way in which you can use it, seems like this is where you're confused, so here some examples:

you can use it attributive:
Uno anno duo consules sine memorando proelio ab Hannibalis militibus iterfecti sunt.
In one single jear two consuls were killed by Hannibals soldiers without a battle worth remembering.

praedicative:
Hannibal insidias parandas curavit.
Hannibal was responisble for the carrying out of the attacks (I'm no good at translating exactly, I know :wink: ).

or as a noun belonging to the main verb:
Denique bellum in Africa finiendum erat.
At last the war had to be ended in Africa.

Don't be mixed up with the Gerundium and Gerundivum.
Hope that helped a bit.
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