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Postby yuntao » Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:51 am

During my reading, I have met two Latin sentences , Which I can follow it .Please help me translate them.
1 Veniam petimus, dabimusq; vicissim.
2 Litteratos gravissimo Somno stertere convincam.—Hieron
Thanks a lot!
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Re: Ask for a help!

Postby adrianus » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:21 pm

What have you translated so far from these sentences, yuntao?
Quid ex his sententiis iam vertisti, yuntao?

nota: "dabimusq." = "dabimusque"
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ask for a help!

Postby thesaurus » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:39 pm

You beat me to it, Adrianus.

Yuntao, may I ask where you found these sentences? I wonder whether you (or your source?) transcribed the second correctly. After digging around I managed to turn up this from Jerome's "Commentary in Isiah" Book IV:
"haec breviter diximus, ut Judaizantes nostros gravissimo somno stertere convincamus" (of which, possibly due to its context, the meaning is somewhat obscure to me).
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Ask for a help!

Postby adrianus » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:18 pm

I suspect it alludes to God's word revealing itself in visions and dreams, but unbelievers merely snore through it in a very deep sleep. The phrase is a call to wake up.
Ut suspicor, illa verba hoc alludunt: è visione somnioque sonat vox dei at modo sternunt per totum gravissimo somno infideles. Ut nos excitemus dictum appellat.

ut Judaizantes nostros gravissimo somno stertere convincamus
I/we'll prove that those of us following Jewish customs are in a very deep sleep snoring away.

and, "litteratos" = "educated men", yuntao

Which leaves // Manent ergô sequentia:
convincam = ?
veniam = ?
petimus = ?
dabimusque = ?
vicissim = ?
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Ask for a help!

Postby adrianus » Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:57 pm

In Horace's Letter to Pisones, line 11, which elsewhere has become "veniam petimus dabimusque vicissim"
Horatii ad Pisones in Epistulâ, versus unus decimus: "Scimus, et hanc veniam petimusque damusque vicissim"


Vide http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=IOQq ... #v=onepage
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Thanks a lot!

Postby yuntao » Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:42 am

Thanks a lot, Adrianus and thesaurus ! I met these two latin sentences in Thomas Woolston, SIX DISCOURSES ON THE MIRACLECS OF OUR SAVIOUR And DEFENCES OF HIS DISCOURSES 1727-1730,Garland Publishing Inc., 1979.The first sentence is in the first discourse ,P.65, the second on the title page of the third discourse. Many latin quoations and Greek words in this book are different from their original resources;what is worse ,the author do not give their origins, so it is difficult for a layman like me to understand them .
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