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Ablative Case w. Prepostitoin

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Ablative Case w. Prepostitoin

Postby dlb » Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:53 am

The following, from Lingua Latina, reads,
"In Italia sunt multae villae cum magnis hortis."
My questions, please:
1) Why is 'hortis' in the ablative case? (It could also be in the dative case.)
2) What is the direct object of this sentence?
Thanks,
dlb
.
Deus me ducet, non ratio.
Observito Quam Educatio Melius Est.
dlb
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Re: Ablative Case w. Prepostitoin

Postby spiphany » Fri Oct 30, 2009 1:22 pm

'sum' cannot take a direct object (it simply states existence or links two things as equivalent, think of it like an equal sign)

'magnis hortis' are governed by the preposition 'cum'.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)
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Re: Ablative Case w. Prepostitoin

Postby dlb » Sat Oct 31, 2009 12:56 am

Thanks for the reply but I have a further question, if you don't mind:
You wrote: 'magnis hortis' are governed by the preposition 'cum'
Can you elaborate on where one might find the governing rules - a grammar, a text book, a web site?
Thanks,
dlb
.
Deus me ducet, non ratio.
Observito Quam Educatio Melius Est.
dlb
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Posts: 133
Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 1:43 am
Location: Lilburn, Ga.

Re: Ablative Case w. Prepostitoin

Postby spiphany » Sat Oct 31, 2009 8:20 am

Any decent Latin grammar or textbook should cover this information.
Allan & Greenough is I think the standard college reference grammar.
I think there's also a supplement to Lingua Latina which explicitly explains the grammatical information.
Or you can google "Latin grammar," I'm sure there are some good sites which provide an overview of the basics.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)
spiphany
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Location: Munich


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