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Brief question: unexpected accusative case.

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Brief question: unexpected accusative case.

Postby al123 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:31 pm

I have a brief question. I find the 'dominum' in the following sentence from Seneca's Epistulae #100 puzzling:

"Quam stultum est aetatem disponere ne crastini quidem dominum! "

im reading a side-by-side translation. The translation given is something to the effect: 'How foolish it is to plan a long time when one is not master of tomorrow'. 'Dominum' seems to be in the accusative case. Why is this? why not nominative "Quam stultum est aetatem disponere ne crastini quidem dominus/domini"(with either sum/es/sumus, or another verb implied) " What am I missing?

any- and all help is much appreciated.
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Re: Brief question: unexpected accusative case.

Postby bedwere » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:46 pm

It is the very common accusative plus infinitive construction "aetatem disponere ne crastini quidem dominum" . This is what Seneca calls foolish.
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Re: Brief question: unexpected accusative case.

Postby al123 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:34 pm

Makes sense. Thank you
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