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Eutropius

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Eutropius

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Sat Jul 08, 2017 2:21 pm

I searched the archives and already found some good discussion on the use of Eutropius. Next year I have a 4th year class (out of 5 years) ready to read selections from Cicero, Ovid, and for the second half of the year either Caesar or Vergil as I prepare that class for the following year's AP course. Every student in this class is a top performer, a couple of them not quite as top performing as the others. I was thinking of using Eutropius for in class rapid sight reading drills, as much to build confidence as for actual Latin practice, since I find Eutropius not far removed in difficulty from Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles. Good idea? Other authors who could fit this (and I do plan on doing sight readings from more difficult authors)?
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Re: Eutropius

Postby metrodorus » Sun Jul 09, 2017 12:16 pm

Eutropius was the traditional 'first classical author' - but suffers from being rather dry.

John Stirling has a Latin paraphrase of Eutropius which can be a useful tool to use alongside the text, for classroom teaching.

Other accessible authors used as introductory authors were Curtius and Cornelius Nepos.
I run http://latinum.org.uk which provides the Adler Audio Latin Course, other audio materials, and additional free materials on YouTube.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:20 pm

metrodorus wrote:Eutropius was the traditional 'first classical author' - but suffers from being rather dry.

John Stirling has a Latin paraphrase of Eutropius which can be a useful tool to use alongside the text, for classroom teaching.

Other accessible authors used as introductory authors were Curtius and Cornelius Nepos.


Thanks for the response. I envision "sight reading drills" taking about 5 minutes, similar to a quiz and using a short selection from an author. I agree that Eutropius is a bit dry, but in small amounts should be fine. Nepos is another author I was thinking of using as well. Hadn't thought of Curtius, I'll have a look.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Hylander » Mon Jul 10, 2017 6:54 pm

Short excerpts, chosen for ease, from Seneca's Epistulae Morales?
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Dantius » Tue Jul 11, 2017 1:34 am

I agree that Eutropius is a good easy author.
By the way, a medieval writer named Paul the Deacon wrote a work called Historia Romana which is basically an expanded version of Eutropius. The 10 books of Eutropius are fleshed out with slightly more detail, and 5 extra books are added to the end. Especially the parts about the emperors (book 7 and on) are pretty interesting, and Paul the Deacon incorporates a few funny anecdotes from Suetonius.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby rothbard » Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:28 pm

The Historia Augusta is probably suitable as an introductory text as well.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Hylander » Fri Jul 14, 2017 9:29 pm

Maybe select passages from Suetonius, too.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby bedwere » Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:12 am

Maybe this edition with Greek parallel text could be useful to introduce the students to that language.

Eutropi Breviarium ab urbe condita cum versionibus graecis et ...,
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Barry Hofstetter » Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:21 pm

bedwere wrote:Maybe this edition with Greek parallel text could be useful to introduce the students to that language.

Eutropi Breviarium ab urbe condita cum versionibus graecis et ...,


Now, that's a hoot. Thanks -- I wasn't even aware of the existence of the Greek version. Several of my students in that class have more than once expressed a desire for Greek, but time, alas, is limited, and I'll only be making limited use of Eutropius anyway.
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Re: Eutropius

Postby Dantius » Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:47 pm

rothbard wrote:The Historia Augusta is probably suitable as an introductory text as well.

The first sentence there has a typo (vetustiora for vetustior)! Either way, I haven't read the Historia Augusta but from what I've read about it it's a lot like Suetonius (except not really as good in some aspects of style). It seems simple enough, though not nearly as easy as Eutropius.
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