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Latin pronunciation

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Latin pronunciation

Postby Anthony Appleyard » Wed Jan 16, 2013 9:07 am

In teaching Latin (or other foreign languages) to speakers of American English, is there much difficulty in getting them to give 't' between vowels its full value and not reduce it to 'd' or slur it or omit it?
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Re: Latin pronunciation

Postby Nesrad » Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:30 pm

I don't know about teaching, but when I hear native English speakers speak Latin, there's no trouble with t, but some major issues with r and l. But the worst I've heard are native speakers of German who in addition to the r issue, have an irresistible tendency to pronounce e as if it were i, which really drives me nuts to the point that I can't listen to Germans speaking Latin.
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Re: Latin pronunciation

Postby thesaurus » Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:07 pm

When I was teaching introductory Latin in college, I was just happy if my students could remember their declensions and conjugations. I didn't put much attention on pronunciation. I wish I could have used a more modern method of teaching languages, but I had to abide by the department's expectations for course curricula.

As best as I can remember, most pronunciation issues would have been with vowels rather than consonants.
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Latin pronunciation

Postby Anthony Appleyard » Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:36 pm

Nesrad wrote:... native speakers of German who in addition to the r issue, have an irresistible tendency to pronounce e as if it were i, which really drives me nuts to the point that I can't listen to Germans speaking Latin.


And elsewhere :: some USA speakers pronouncing English "pen" as "pin" and suchlike is confusing.
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Re: Latin pronunciation

Postby Anthony Appleyard » Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:39 am

When I was at school in the late 1950's. we learned Latin. One boy in my class always pronounced English long 'o' (as in "bone") as "aw" in "lawn". As a result of this and of British English arhotacism, in Latin he pronounced "amo" and "amor" identically.
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Re: Latin pronunciation

Postby adrianus » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:42 am

Perperàm hûc misi. Modo alio filo mittere ausus sum.
I sent this to the wrong place. I meant to post to this topic: http://www.textkit.com/greek-latin-forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=59550

According to the ancient grammarians, there is no difference in sound between long and short vowels, just the length of the sound. I think that is true. I suspect it is a habit of English-speakers to use different sounds to distinguish long and short vowels. That clipping a long, full sound seems to result in a different sound is a separate issue, related to the formation of a full sound over time. I don't think an Italian student of Latin distinguishes long and short in the manner that English speakers were taught to.

Secundum grammaticos antiquos, nullum discrimen exstat inter brevis vocalis sonum et sonum longae, solum est longitudinis vel longinquitatis discrimen. Rectè dicunt, ut opinor. Consuetudo olim erat, ut suspicor, eorum quo anglicè loquuntur ut longitudo vocalis aliter distinguatur. Longa et plena vocalis spatium temporis requirit ut ea planè sonetur, qui correpta aliter sonari videtur. Non novus autem est sonus. De sonis vocalum non itidem sonat italicus latinae linguae discipulus eius qui est anglicus vel americanus.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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