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Recognising Gender in -ος ending

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Recognising Gender in -ος ending

Postby jayvyn » Wed Feb 05, 2014 11:31 am

I have been studying hermeneutics. I have difficulty in recognizing gender in Koine Greek. Since both masculine and feminine ends in -os. E.g. Λογoς and όδος. Both of those two words end in -ος. How would I know the gender use?
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Re: Recognising Gender in -ος ending

Postby Σαῦλος » Wed Feb 05, 2014 2:07 pm

The best option is to not worry about it. Read, absorb, and carry on. You will learn that ὁδος is feminine in the same way English learners find out that when talking about a ship, they should say, "She is beautiful."

Regarding hermeneutics, it makes no difference in meaning if I read "It is beautiful" or "she is beautiful." In the same way, it makes no difference in meaning if I say,
    ἡ ὁδός ἐστίν καλή. The road is beautiful.
    ὁ λόγος ἐστίν καλός. The word is beautiful.
I will babble until I talk. ετι λαλαγω...
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Re: Recognising Gender in -ος ending

Postby jayvyn » Thu Feb 06, 2014 3:17 am

Does it mean that gender doesn't matter in hermeneutics? One thing, why the article use become differ in gender i.e., ό and ή? E.g. ὁ λόγος ἐστίν καλός. You use article ό while in your second sentence ἡ ὁδός ἐστίν καλή. You use article ή.
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Re: Recognising Gender in -ος ending

Postby uberdwayne » Thu Feb 06, 2014 4:09 am

Does it mean that gender doesn't matter in hermeneutics?

Gender does matter when it comes to pronouns... Very important! However, the article (ὁ, ἡ, το)itself has the same meaning whether its masculine, feminine or neuter.

why the article use become differ in gender i.e., ό and ή? E.g. ὁ λόγος ἐστίν καλός. You use article ό while in your second sentence ἡ ὁδός ἐστίν καλή. You use article ή.


That is because ὁδός is a feminine word and if its articular, the article needs to, by strict grammatical rule, be the same gender that its noun is. I cannot think of any exceptions to this example. λόγος on the other hand is maculin, which requires the masculin article ὁ.
μείζων ἐστὶν ὁ ἐν ὑμῖν ἢ ὁ ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ
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Re: Recognising Gender in -ος ending

Postby jaihare » Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:38 am

jayvyn wrote:I have been studying hermeneutics. I have difficulty in recognizing gender in Koine Greek. Since both masculine and feminine ends in -os. E.g. Λογoς and όδος. Both of those two words end in -ος. How would I know the gender use?


As you learn Greek, you will learn that most first-declension nouns (ending with α or η in the root) are feminine and most second-declension nouns (ending with ο in the root) are either masculine or neuter (with different endings in the nominative and accusative). However, there are some masculine nouns that end with -ης (having -η as the end of the root) and are of the first declension, and some feminine nouns that end in -ος and are of the second declension.

I don't know what you mean by asking if this has hermeneutical import. It is very clear which nouns are masculine and which are feminine by: (1) accompanying modifiers (as Dwayne mentioned above), and more simply (2) what you find in the dictionary. You can surely search in a lexicon without even looking at the word's context and see if it is marked as masculine or feminine. What type of hermeneutical import could you possibly be searching for within the gender of a noun?

It should be rather clear, though, that you would have trouble recognizing gender in a language that you haven't studied. I assume that you also have trouble recognizing tense. Not having learned Greek (apparently), how would you know whether ἔπεμψα is aorist or imperfect – or even what the difference between aorist and imperfect is? I would think that these distinctions have more hemeneutical significance than the gender of a noun (which is really unimportant in the grand scheme of things).
Jason Hare
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τοὺς θεοὺς εὔχομαί σοι διδόναι ὑγίειαν καὶ σωτηρίαν καὶ ἀγαθὰ πολλά.
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