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Chapter and Verse

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Chapter and Verse

Postby Bardo de Saldo » Sat Apr 09, 2005 6:04 am

You Biblicals know how to have a good time!

I've heard the expression "chapter and verse" referred to the Bible, and yet the only poetry I remember in it are the Psalms (in Hebrew, I assume).

Did the Evangelists write their Greek in verse originally, or does the expression come from later translations into English in verse?
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Postby Geoff » Sat Apr 09, 2005 2:32 pm

Verse applys mainly to the divisions within the chapter given primarily for reference. There are poetic sections throughout the scriptures, but the books of Job, psalms, proverbs,Ecclesiastes, and song of solomon are all primarily poetic.

These divisions, while not arbitrary, do ignore natural divisions on several occasions. These were added to the various texts later.

I cannot remember who did the original divisions, but chapters and verses were added by different editors and the Old and NT were done separately.

Some googlin couldn't hurt.
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Postby chad » Wed Apr 13, 2005 6:13 am

There are poetic sections throughout the scriptures, but the books of Job, psalms, proverbs,Ecclesiastes, and song of solomon are all primarily poetic.


hi, what metre do they use? greek verse right? i did a quick perseus search but the book of job there was in latin. thanks :)
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Postby Bardo de Saldo » Wed Apr 13, 2005 5:30 pm

Thanks, Geoff. I asked Google, and the answer was: "Go ask the folks one door down the hall".

I've taken a look at John's Evangel in greekbible.com, and it looks like 'verse' is used as a synonym of 'sentence', not 'line of poetry'. My Greek is too rinky-dink for literary criticism, so my question stands: Did the Evangelists write poetry or prose? Are their metaphors original or idiomatic? Were all evangels written originally in Greek? If so, those Jews were the best educated folks in the world. Fishermen and carpenters writing in Greek! "Is that a sardine, Luke?" "Depends. What is a sardine, really?"

Chad, the books in your quote are from the Old Testament, and were written in Hebrew (my guess), not Greek. I'll also guess that since Semite languages don't use written vowels, they wouldn't have used quantity as their metrical yard-stick.
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Postby Kasper » Wed Apr 13, 2005 10:44 pm

Bardo de Saldo wrote:Thanks, Geoff. I asked Google, and the answer was: "Go ask the folks one door down the hall".

I've taken a look at John's Evangel in greekbible.com, and it looks like 'verse' is used as a synonym of 'sentence', not 'line of poetry'. My Greek is too rinky-dink for literary criticism, so my question stands: Did the Evangelists write poetry or prose? Are their metaphors original or idiomatic? Were all evangels written originally in Greek? If so, those Jews were the best educated folks in the world. Fishermen and carpenters writing in Greek! "Is that a sardine, Luke?" "Depends. What is a sardine, really?"

Chad, the books in your quote are from the Old Testament, and were written in Hebrew (my guess), not Greek. I'll also guess that since Semite languages don't use written vowels, they wouldn't have used quantity as their metrical yard-stick.


1. the gospels are written in prose. Although John has a reasonably poetic style of writing, his writings are not in any meter.
2. You speak english and portuguese (right?) does that make you the best educated person in the world? Greek was just the going language in international relations just like english is today.
3. I think you raise a good point about semitic meter, but just because they didn't write vowels didn't mean they had non. They could still have used quantity.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Postby Bardo de Saldo » Tue Apr 19, 2005 5:16 pm

Thank you, Kasper.

As a poet, my lyrism leads my mind in this direction: For the guy who wrote Genesis, verse, sentence and word of God were synonym.
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Re: Chapter and Verse

Postby joja » Thu Apr 01, 2010 1:22 am

Re: Chapters and Verses of the Bible

"There's not another piece of literature written anywhere that can do that.
And mathematically, and geographically, in every way, there's not a Book
in the Bible wrote like the Bible... There's not a book in the world, I mean,
wrote like the Bible. There's nothing. The pneumatics of the Bible is
perfectly in harmony; just even chapters, and punctuations, and everything,
is perfect. Not another book; you couldn't read a chapter out of it without
crossing itself back. But there's not one cross-up in the entire Bible.
And was wrote by many, many, many people; and hundreds, and hundreds,
and hundreds of years apart. Not knowing one piece; one wrote It here,
and one wrote It here, and one wrote It over here. When It was all formed
together, It made God's Bible. And not one contradicts the other one, and,
no, not mathematics, geographics. Anything else of the Bible, everything,
pneumatic, everything runs perfectly together. That isn't inspired, I don't know,
what will you call inspiration? I'm so glad for the blessed, old Bible.
16 Some of them said, "Are you a Catholic? Protestant?"
I said, "Neither one. I believe the Bible." That's right. I believe the Bible,

Oh, my! I say, the Scripture is mathematically inspired. I say, the Scripture is,
and in every way, inspired. The mathematics of the Bible are perfect.

But if you get off the mathematics, you'll have, in your picture,
a cow picking grass in top of a tree.
So, it won't--it won't look right. See?
Stay in the mathematics, you see, of the Bible,
then you place it out right." - William M. Branham
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Re: Chapter and Verse

Postby timothyericson » Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:38 am

Thanks for the informations!!!

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