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Verbs whose Present and Aorist Stems seem identical

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Verbs whose Present and Aorist Stems seem identical

Postby Altair » Wed Jul 26, 2017 3:13 am

In going through P.A. Draper's Iliad:Book 1:Homer, I have come across two verbs whose individual present and aorist stems seem identical: κλύω and ἕζομαι. I confirmed this in my middle Liddell and Scott. Are there many other such verbs with identical present and aorist stems, and why do these two exist?

From what Beekes has in his Etymological Dictionary of Greek, I can speculate on an etymology for ἕζομαι that might account for two originally separate forms coalescing after sound changes into one, but have no clue about κλύω. For κλύω, Beekes seems to suggest that the present stem is an innovation from the aorist, but why would nothing be added to it?
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Re: Verbs whose Present and Aorist Stems seem identical

Postby Paul Derouda » Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:49 am

He probably means that at some stage, the original aorist ἔκλυον was reinterpreted as an imperfect and employed as such, and was used to derive other present-stem forms. Yoy might compare the confusion in English between lie/lay/lain and lay/laid/laid.
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Re: Verbs whose Present and Aorist Stems seem identical

Postby Altair » Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:06 pm

Thanks for your answer. Your interpretation makes a lot of sense. I particularly like your analogy with the confusion between "lie" and "lay." Although the etymological details are, of course, different, the phenomenon can be intuitively be interpreted in the same way.
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