Textkit Logo

Unit I, Reading

Are you learning Latin with Latin: An Intensive Course by Moreland and Fleischer? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Unit I, Reading

Postby bschuth » Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:51 pm

First, I assume the answer key project is now dead?

Second, this sentence in the reading has me puzzled:

Fama enim reginae non erat cura.

I'm reading this as "Of course, the reputation of the queen was not a concern," which is something of a non sequitur. I'm wondering if the intent of the sentence is to express the fact that the queen's office was not an impediment to love she and the sailor have for one another. As I have translated it, I'm not sure what it is supposed to mean!
User avatar
bschuth
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Jan 13, 2005 3:57 am
Location: Maine, USA

Postby benissimus » Mon Mar 14, 2005 10:22 pm

Here is a little advice when translating sentences from this textbook which may help to preserve your sanity:
do not try to make sense of them, they are random and often awkward and in no way related to each other. :) Your translation is good, but I would not try to weave it into any larger plots established by previous sentences.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Unit I reading, second question

Postby Feles in silva » Fri Sep 23, 2005 4:49 pm

Postermo nauta reginam relinquit et regina vitam.

I translated it as:

Finally, the sailor abandons the country and the queen [abandons] life.

Does this look right?
Feles in silva
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 116
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 2:21 am

Re: Unit I reading, second question

Postby benissimus » Fri Sep 23, 2005 6:30 pm

Feles in silva wrote:Postermo nauta reginam relinquit et regina vitam.

I translated it as:

Finally, the sailor abandons the country and the queen [abandons] life.

Does this look right?

I think you mean "the sailor abandons the queen."
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby Feles in silva » Fri Sep 23, 2005 6:52 pm

Whoops! Yes, I meant the queen. And then the queen abandons life.

Is the sentence in this reading a common construct?
Feles in silva
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 116
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2004 2:21 am

Postby benissimus » Fri Sep 23, 2005 9:20 pm

Yes, it is very common to omit the verb if the same verb would be used twice in a single sentence, especially if that verb would appear in the same form twice (as is the case here).
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to M&F's Latin: An Intensive Course

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron