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Unit #1 Ex 19

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Unit #1 Ex 19

Postby kyaman » Sun Jan 16, 2005 9:05 pm

I am working through Unit 1 exercises and drills. I got stuck at #19:
Feminae est forma, fama nautae; feminis est forma, fama nautis.
The link to the the PDF answer key seems to be down, any help would be appreciated. If I ignore the comma I can come up with:
The woman's beauty is the talk of the sailor for the first part but otherwise, the only way I could make sense of it is:
Beauty is of the woman (belongs to the woman), the talk of the sailor; beauty is from the women, the talk by (amongst) the sailors?? Hmm, I am confused.
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Postby Turpissimus » Sun Jan 16, 2005 9:45 pm

I think it's meant to be:

Beauty is for the woman, renown for the sailor


And the same sentiment repeated in the plural. Since the sentences are together it's fairly obvious that the writer intended them to express the same ideas in the singular and plural. -ae can be the ending of both the genitive and dative singular. -is of both the dative and ablative plural.
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Postby kyaman » Mon Jan 17, 2005 8:09 pm

Turpissimus wrote:I think it's meant to be:

Beauty is for the woman, renown for the sailor


And the same sentiment repeated in the plural. Since the sentences are together it's fairly obvious that the writer intended them to express the same ideas in the singular and plural. -ae can be the ending of both the genitive and dative singular. -is of both the dative and ablative plural.


Thanks that makes sense; I did not think of Dative in the sense of "for" someone.
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Postby Deses » Tue Jan 18, 2005 12:59 am

Turpissimus wrote:I think it's meant to be:

Beauty is for the woman, renown for the sailor



Wouldn't this be Dative of Possession? If so, it is formally introduced in unit 4 o 5. An example of what I mentioned a few days ago.
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