Textkit Logo

Unit 2 Exercises Confusion

Are you learning Latin with Latin: An Intensive Course by Moreland and Fleischer? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Unit 2 Exercises Confusion

Postby Baroque1977 » Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:28 am

In #'s 4-7 of the Exercises of Unit 2, I am quite confused about how to translate the protases...

4. Incolae si feminas insulae damnarent, nautae ad terram venire non dubitarent.

What does the "insulae" connect with? Is it a genitive of penalty (condemned to the island), a genitive modifying Incolae (inhabitants of the island), or is it "women of the island?"

5. Incolae si insulae feminas damnavissent, nautae ad terram venire non dubitavissent.

Here, they changed the position of insulae. Does this change the meaning? Is it, "if the inhabitants had condemned the women to the island...", "the inhabitants of the island", or "the women of the island"?

6. Incolae si insulae feminas insidiarum damnent, nautae ad provinciam venire non dubitent.

Here, it's clear that "insidiarum" is the genitive of the charge. So what does "insulae" go along with here?

7. Incolae si feminas in turba damnabunt, nautae ad insulam venire non dubitabunt.

What does "in turba" go with? Is it, "the inhabitants in the crowd" or "the women in the crowd" ?

Thanks!
User avatar
Baroque1977
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2004 1:23 pm
Location: Southeastern Massachusetts

Re: Unit 2 Exercises Confusion

Postby benissimus » Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:41 am

Baroque1977 wrote:In #'s 4-7 of the Exercises of Unit 2, I am quite confused about how to translate the protases...

4. Incolae si feminas insulae damnarent, nautae ad terram venire non dubitarent.

What does the "insulae" connect with? Is it a genitive of penalty (condemned to the island), a genitive modifying Incolae (inhabitants of the island), or is it "women of the island?"

5. Incolae si insulae feminas damnavissent, nautae ad terram venire non dubitavissent.

Here, they changed the position of insulae. Does this change the meaning? Is it, "if the inhabitants had condemned the women to the island...", "the inhabitants of the island", or "the women of the island"?

6. Incolae si insulae feminas insidiarum damnent, nautae ad provinciam venire non dubitent.

Here, it's clear that "insidiarum" is the genitive of the charge. So what does "insulae" go along with here?

"women of the island" in all the above cases. The genitive almost always goes with the closest noun, or the one that makes the most sense.

7. Incolae si feminas in turba damnabunt, nautae ad insulam venire non dubitabunt.

What does "in turba" go with? Is it, "the inhabitants in the crowd" or "the women in the crowd" ?

Thanks!

It goes with the closest, "the women in the crowd".
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California


Return to M&F's Latin: An Intensive Course

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests