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M&F Unit 16 English to Latin

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M&F Unit 16 English to Latin

Postby bingley » Sun Feb 22, 2004 11:23 am

Could someone look over these English to Latin translations for me, please?

The topics for this unit are:
a. Gerunds
b. Gerundives
c. Impersonal Verbs

1. The queen was so ashamed of her burning love for the handsome leader that she drove him from her state.
Amoris pro duce decoro ardentis reginam tam pudet ut e re publica eum expulerit.

2. In order to terrify the citizens, the legate ordered the troops that they attack and destroy their province.
Civium terrendorum causa legatus manus iussit ut provinciam eorum oppugnarent et delerent.

3. The art of writing a province is so difficult that very few men are desirous of learning how it should be done.
Tam difficilis carminis scribendi ars quam pauci qui cupidi quomodo faciendum discendi.

4. After the torches had been carried into the gates, the king was able to show the lofty gates to the guests from the province who had come to learn the art of fortifying towns.
Taedis in portis tulis rex moenia alta hospitibus e provincia monstrare poterat qui ad oppidorum muniendorum artem discendam venissent.

5. Learning other people's laws bores me; I don't even have time to read our own.
De legibus alienis discendi me taedet; etiam ad nostras legendas tempore careo.
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Re: M&F Unit 16 English to Latin

Postby Skylax » Sun Feb 22, 2004 2:48 pm

bingley wrote:1. The queen was so ashamed of her burning love for the handsome leader that she drove him from her state.
Amoris pro duce decoro ardentis reginam tam pudet ut e re publica eum expulerit.

- pro duce decoro : also possible : (amor) in ducem decorum/formosum/pulchrum
- re publica : I would say regno, because, where there is a queen, the political res is not so publica :P
- pudet : pudebat/puduit (or puditum est)

2. In order to terrify the citizens, the legate ordered the troops that they attack and destroy their province.
Civium terrendorum causa legatus manus iussit ut provinciam eorum oppugnarent et delerent.

- manus : I have never seen manus in the plural meaning "troops" (See Lewis & Short on Perseus). It would be safer to use the obvious copias.
- "ordered that" : either iubeo with an infinitive clause or impero ut with the subjunctive, so either

legatus copias iussit provinciam (regionem ?) eorum aggredi et delere (invadere et vastare)

or

legatus copiis imperavit ut eorum provinciam aggrederentur et delerent
(invaderent et vastarent)


3. The art of writing a province is so difficult that very few men are desirous of learning how it should be done.
Tam difficilis carminis scribendi ars quam pauci qui cupidi quomodo faciendum discendi.

tam... quam... : comparison (as... as...); here it is a consequence : tam... ut with subjunctive : ut paucissimi discere cupiant quomodo id faciendum sit (I would not use cupidi with a gerund that is itself followed by an indirect question : it is, say, heavy...)

4. After the torches had been carried into the gates, the king was able to show the lofty gates to the guests from the province who had come to learn the art of fortifying towns.
Taedis in portis tulis rex moenia alta hospitibus e provincia monstrare poterat qui ad oppidorum muniendorum artem discendam venissent.

- in portis : in portas (motion toward) or ad portas
- tulis : latis (fero, tuli, latum)
- poterat possible, but rather potuit
- venissent why not indicative convenerant ?

5. Learning other people's laws bores me; I don't even have time to read our own.
De legibus alienis discendi me taedet; etiam ad nostras legendas tempore careo.
[/i]

- "laws to be learned" is in the genitive with me taedet : Legum alienarum discendarum me taedet
- tempore careo : maybe mihi otium non est; you could also use vacare with the dative "to be free (lit. "empty") for something", thus : nostris etiam legendis non vaco. Follow the advice of M&F.

Best regards :D
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Postby bingley » Wed Feb 25, 2004 4:06 am

Thank you again, Skylax

Quote:

4. After the torches had been carried into the gates, the king was able to show the lofty gates to the guests from the province who had come to learn the art of fortifying towns.
Taedis in portis tulis rex moenia alta hospitibus e provincia monstrare poterat qui ad oppidorum muniendorum artem discendam venissent.


- in portis : in portas (motion toward) or ad portas
- tulis : latis (fero, tuli, latum)
- poterat possible, but rather potuit
- venissent why not indicative convenerant ?



I chose poterat as an inceptive imperfect. The king began to be able to show the gates when the torches arrived.

I dithered for a long time over whether to use the subjunctive or indicative for 'who had come'. In the end I decided it characterised which group of guests from the province the king showed the gates, and so should be subjunctive. Am I right in thinking hospitibus qui ... venissent tells us which guests out of many guests -- that some of the guests had come to learn the art while others had not -- while hospitibus qui .... venerant would mean all of the guests had come to learn the art?

Quote:
5. Learning other people's laws bores me; I don't even have time to read our own.
De legibus alienis discendi me taedet; etiam ad nostras legendas tempore careo.


A typo in the English. M&F had 'Learning about other people's laws'.

Follow the advice of M&F.


Sorry, I don't understand. What advice?
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