Textkit Logo

Herodotus

Here's where you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Herodotus

Postby Lina » Sun May 31, 2009 10:26 pm

Hi,

This passage is from Athenaze 25β, and is a from a reading from Herodotus 1.32-33. Croesus has been trying to get Solon to proclaim him the most fortunate of men, and Solon has been insisting that fortunes change and a noble death is best of all.

Ο Σολων ταυτα λεγων
Solon, saying these things,

τω Κροισω ουκετι εχαριζετο,
was no longer finding favor with Croesus,

αλλα ο Κροισος αποπεμπει αυτον, δοξας αυτον αμαθη ειναι,
but Croesus sent him away, thinking him to be stupid,

ος (rough breathing, accent grave) τα παροντα αγαθα μεθεις την τελευτην παντος χρηματος οραν εκελευε.
who (Croesus) was telling (Solon) to see the good things being present, ignoring the ending.

My problem is the final line, and my difficulty in figuring out what is linked to what.

Additionally, the way I have interpreted it, the entire final line would fit (in English) between Κροισος and αποπεμπει.
"...Croesus, who was telling Solon to see the good things present, ignoring the ending, sent him away, thinking him to be stupid."

Any suggestions? Is there a method for breaking down a phrase like that?
Lina
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 10:11 pm

Re: Herodotus

Postby thesaurus » Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:07 am

Lina wrote:ος (rough breathing, accent grave) τα παροντα αγαθα μεθεις την τελευτην παντος χρηματος οραν εκελευε.
who (Croesus) was telling (Solon) to see the good things being present, ignoring the ending.


I looked up the original passage:
ὃς τὰ παρεόντα ἀγαθὰ μετεὶς τὴν τελευτὴν παντὸς χρήματος ὁρᾶν ἐκέλευε.

"Who letting go of the present goods was ordering [Croesus] to see the end/outcome of all money."

"μετεὶς" is the aorist present participle of "μεθίημι" meaning "to let go, give up [a thing]."

So it might help to put a comma after "μεθεις." I inferred this by reading it as a dependent clause, and after reading the noun phrase I expect some kind of verb to govern it, which I'm given with the participle. When I move on to "την τελευτην" I keep my eyes open for another verb, and fortunately we find the combo "οραν εκελευε" at the end.
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
thesaurus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 9:44 pm

Re: Herodotus

Postby Nicolaus » Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:38 pm

I'd reserve the meaning 'money' for the plural of χρῆμα, the singular meaning 'thing':

ὃς [τὰ παρεόντα ἀγαθὰ μετεὶς] τὴν τελευτὴν παντὸς χρήματος ὁρᾶν ἐκέλευε.

"Who [letting go of the present goods] was ordering [Croesus] to see the end/outcome of each thing."
Nicolaus
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun May 31, 2009 1:58 pm


Return to Learning Greek

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ariphron, Google Adsense [Bot], Yahoo [Bot], ÓBuadhaigh and 49 guests