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Best Textbook for Autodidact?

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Best Textbook for Autodidact?

Postby kultej » Tue Sep 16, 2008 5:49 am

Hi Everyone,

I've reviewed the existing posts in this forum about the respective virtues of the various Attic Greek textbooks/courses out there today, but I'm still unsure about what's right for me.

I'm doing this all on my own, and as someone with a fourth-year undergrad's grasp of Latin (obtained via the Wheelock books). I have Greek: An Intensive Course by H&Q, but I find that, without a key to use for evaluating my exercises, I'm getting nowhere.

So here's my conundrum now. On the one hand, I'm inclined towards getting my hands on JACT's three-book Reading Greek series. On the other, I think that maybe Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek (plus answer key) might be better for me on account of its apparently more thorough explanation of matters of grammar.

Advice? I'd appreciate any kind of suggestion.

Thanks!
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Postby Twpsyn » Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:50 pm

Get as many textbooks as you can and use them simultaneously.
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Postby jk0592 » Tue Sep 16, 2008 3:06 pm

It is very difficult to follow many grammars at the same time. The best way to go is to choose one and stick with it until you reach the end of the book.
Then you go to another grammar, and hopefully read some real Greek texts at the same time.
Jean K.
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Postby vir litterarum » Tue Sep 16, 2008 3:31 pm

I find it difficult to contradict the esteemed opinion of Professor Dik, so Mastronarde is probably your best option.

Helma
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Postby Bert » Wed Sep 17, 2008 1:16 am

jk0592 wrote:It is very difficult to follow many grammars at the same time. The best way to go is to choose one and stick with it until you reach the end of the book.
Then you go to another grammar, and hopefully read some real Greek texts at the same time.

I think your advice is better than using as many textbooks as you can get a hold of. Pick your grammar to use from cover to cover and get a reference grammar with a good index, like Smyth, to look up things that aren't very clear to you.
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Postby Essorant » Wed Sep 17, 2008 2:11 am

I as well began studying Attic Greek with <u>Greek: An Intensive Course</u>. After that , however, I met Mastronarde's <u>Introduction to Attic Greek</u> and found it a much more enlightening experience. All the "clutter" from An Intensive Course, seemed to become much more balanced and focused when I used Mastronarde's grammar. Even though the earlier grammar was indeed "intensive" and helpful, I do wish I began with Mastronarde's book instead.<pre> </pre>
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Postby thesaurus » Wed Sep 17, 2008 5:32 pm

I read through Mastronarde on my own and found its explanations easy to understand and very developed. I did complete an inductive reading course before Mastronarde, however, so I had some additional background info to apply the grammar to.
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Postby kultej » Fri Sep 19, 2008 7:13 am

Will no one proselytize on behalf of the J.A.C.T. course? Hmmm. I guess the Mastronarde text is the more popular option, and I'll go with that. Thanks for the input, y'all.
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Postby tico » Fri Sep 19, 2008 1:42 pm

You should also take a look at Athenaze. It is, in my humble opinion, far better than Reading Greek in many aspects.
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Postby jk0592 » Fri Sep 19, 2008 4:21 pm

I agree with giving a try at Athenaze. Volume 1 is easy going, and Volume 2 is much more involved.
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Postby kultej » Tue Sep 23, 2008 11:22 pm

But, doesn't Athenaze lack a key?
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Postby savarez » Wed Sep 24, 2008 12:26 am

kultej wrote:But, doesn't Athenaze lack a key?

Teacher's Handbooks are available for both volumes. Best bet is to contact OUP and explain that you are on a self-study program. There are several posts revealed from a Google search that OUP has, at least on some occasions, comped Teacher's Handbooks to homeschooling parents.
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Postby jk0592 » Wed Sep 24, 2008 12:55 am

I have never used a key with Athenaze...With some work, it gets clear what are the answers. Plus, if you go back to previous chapters as you gain extra knowledge, and with your vocabulary that expands, there are no reason why you would need a key.
The main difficulty with learning on your own as an autodidact is to keep your motivation high.
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