Textkit Logo

What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνειμι)

Here you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Greek, and more.

What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνειμι)

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sat Sep 08, 2018 3:10 pm

Is there any identifiable morphology for ἔνι?
"I've a balm for bruised hearts, brother, sleep for aching eyes,"
Says the warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries.
(John Masefield)
User avatar
ἑκηβόλος
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:19 am
Location: Nanchang, PRC

Re: What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνε

Postby polemistes » Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:18 pm

That was an interesting question. I googled ἔνι and ἔνειμι and a discussion came up in google books from "Man and Woman, One in Christ by Philip Barton Payne: "Although grammarians generally agree on how ἔνι functions and that it is equivalent to ἔνεστι, there are two reasonable explanations of its etymology. Most of the ancient grammarians regarded it as a contracted form of ἔνεστι from the verb ἔνειμι, "to be in." This contracted form occurs frequently in classical, Hellenistic, medieval, and modern Greek. But most recent commentators follow George Benedict Winer's analysis and regard ἔνι to be derived from a poetic form of the preposition ἐν ("in") used in Epic and Attic Greek and in Ionic prose, ἐνί, "strengthened by a more vigorous accent" with the substantive verb "to be" omitted by ellipsis. Analogously, ἔπι (from ἐπί), πάρα (from παρά), ἄνα (from ἀνά) and μέτα (from μετά) were used with the force of ἔπεστι, πάρεστι, ἄνεστι, and μέτεστι. Either explanation of the origin of ἔνι is plausible. Since "to be" is understood elliptically in the second, both explanations result in the same meaning..."
polemistes
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:31 pm

Re: What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνε

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Sep 09, 2018 1:37 am

LSJ, παρά wrote:F. πάρα (with anastrophe) stands for πάρεστι and πάρεισι, Il.1.174, Hes.Op.454, A.Pers.167, Hdt.1.42, al., S.El.285, Ar.Ach.862, etc.
LSJ, πάρειμι wrote:πάρα used for πάρεστι and πάρεισι, Il. 20.98, 23.479, etc.

LSJ, ἐπί wrote:E. II.. ἔπι, for ἔπεστι, there is, Il.1.515, 3.45, Od.16.315; οὐ γὰρ ἔπ᾽ ἀνήρ . . there is no man . . , 2.58; σοὶ δ᾽ ἔ. μὲν μορφὴ “ἐπέων” 11.367; “ἔ. δέ μοι γέρας” A.Eu.393 codd. (lyr.).

LSJ, μετά wrote:F. μέτα, -μέτεστι, Od.21.93, Parm.9.4, Hdt.1.88,171, S.Ant. 48,etc.

The LSJ (1940) entries for ἀνά/ἄνειμι/ἔπειμι/μέτειμι don't mention this phenomenon.
"I've a balm for bruised hearts, brother, sleep for aching eyes,"
Says the warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries.
(John Masefield)
User avatar
ἑκηβόλος
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:19 am
Location: Nanchang, PRC

Re: What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνε

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:46 am

LSJ, πέρι wrote:πέρι : (1)=περίεστι, Κ 244, Od. 12.279.

What is "K" in this context.

(This usage is not mentioned under περίειμι)
"I've a balm for bruised hearts, brother, sleep for aching eyes,"
Says the warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries.
(John Masefield)
User avatar
ἑκηβόλος
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:19 am
Location: Nanchang, PRC

Re: What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνε

Postby opoudjis » Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:10 pm

ἑκηβόλος wrote:LSJ, πέρι wrote:
πέρι : (1)=περίεστι, Κ 244, Od. 12.279.

What is "K" in this context.


That's a rare slipup for LSJ, but uppercase Greek letters refer to books of the Iliad (though LSJ does not use that convention!), and lowercase Greek letters to books of the Odyssey. Κ means book 10 of the Iliad, and Iliad 10.244 does indeed read: οὗ πέρι μὲν πρόφρων κραδίη καὶ θυμὸς ἀγήνωρ
User avatar
opoudjis
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:54 am

Re: What is the morphology of ἔνι? (a 3rd person form of ἔνε

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Wed Sep 12, 2018 2:22 pm

opoudjis wrote:
ἑκηβόλος wrote:LSJ, πέρι wrote:
πέρι : (1)=περίεστι, Κ 244, Od. 12.279.

What is "K" in this context.


That's a rare slipup for LSJ, but uppercase Greek letters refer to books of the Iliad (though LSJ does not use that convention!), and lowercase Greek letters to books of the Odyssey. Κ means book 10 of the Iliad, and Iliad 10.244 does indeed read: οὗ πέρι μὲν πρόφρων κραδίη καὶ θυμὸς ἀγήνωρ

By way of a corrigendum, I mis-referenced the lexicon entry there. That is actually from Georg Autenrieth, A Homeric Dictionary. Apologies especially to opoudjis.
"I've a balm for bruised hearts, brother, sleep for aching eyes,"
Says the warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries.
(John Masefield)
User avatar
ἑκηβόλος
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2013 10:19 am
Location: Nanchang, PRC


Return to Learning Greek