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Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.17.1

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Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.17.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sat Jan 27, 2018 4:56 am

This is my first time to chance upon this declension ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ.

My thinking vasillates between:
  • Is this woman's name sui generis in its declension? AND
  • Is this the pet name that this γύναιον would have been called by, used together with the articles and participles of the female gender?

If it is that second option, ie. a diminutive (for emphasis - caricature - tenderness - pathos??) of the name the has been tup's esposita, is it a common literary device to put the diminutive with the original article?
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sat Jan 27, 2018 11:21 am

LSJ wrote:λύκαινα [υ^], ἡ, fem. of λύκος,
A.she-wolf, Arist.HA580a18, Babr.16.8, Plu.Rom.2; of Artemis in Mithraism, Porph.Abst.4.16:—Dim. λυκαίνιον , τό, of a woman, Poll.4.150.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby bedwere » Sat Jan 27, 2018 6:57 pm

Here is another example of a neuter name given to a girl: St. Eustochium (Εὐστόχιον), who was one of the spiritual daughters of St. Jerome.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:50 pm

Lausaic History (recension G), 41.2 wrote: [ἐν αἷς καὶ Παύλῃ τῇ Ῥωμαίᾳ τῇ μητρὶ Τοξοτίου, γυναικὶ εἰς τὴν πνευματικὴν πολιτείαν ἀστειοτάτῃ· ἧς ἐμπόδιον γέγονεν Ἱερώνυμός τις ἀπὸ ∆αλματίας· δυναμένην γὰρ αὐτὴν ὑπερπτῆναι πασῶν, εὐφυεστάτην οὖσαν, προσενεπόδισε τῇ ἑαυτοῦ βασκανίᾳ ἑλκύσας αὐτὴν πρὸς τὸν ἴδιον αὐτοῦ σκοπόν. Ἧς θυγάτηρ ἐστί, καὶ νῦν ἀσκεῖται, Εὐστόχιον ὀνόματι ἐν Βηθλεέμ· ἧς ἐγὼ ἐν συντυχίᾳ οὐ γέγονα, λέγεται δὲ σφόδρα εἶναι σωφρονεστάτη, συνοδίαν ἔχουσα πεντήκοντα παρθένων.

This differs from the Longus example by not having the article, but Palladius (5th century AD) (or a later redactor) constructs the syntax in the feminine.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby Timothée » Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:55 pm

Female PN’s in -ιον/-ίον (originally hypocoristico-deminutival) were relatively common. That ἡ Λυκαίνιον is no more peculiar than e.g. ἡ ὁδός.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:15 am

Timothée wrote:Female PN’s in -ιον/-ίον (originally hypocoristico-deminutival) were relatively common. That ἡ Λυκαίνιον is no more peculiar than e.g. ἡ ὁδός.

Smyth 228 - 234 doesn't mention ἡ + -ιον/-ίον as a class, and nor does any other source available online that I could find.

Peculiar or not according to mere-exposure, I think the reasons for the feminine ἡ being with ὁδός is different from the reason for it being with Λυκαίνιον. I guess that ὁδός is feminine in grammatical gender (v. Smyth 232.c), while Λυκαίνιον is female in natural gender.

The designation natural gender by choice of the article is common enough for some animals as far as I've seen in Greek. Unless there is a gender bias in the standard grammars against the inclusion of this class of female names as a class of feminine nouns, then in the case of females with -ιον/-ίον names it seems that ἡ is used more demonstratively, ie. "the (= that woman) Lycenium".

It seems to come down to the question of whether this is an unacknowledged class of nouns or a pragmatic exception to the grammatical rules.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby Timothée » Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:24 am

You should use better grammars than Smyth. For example Kühner—Gerth does mention it (§ 96 III):
Kühner und Gerth wrote:Neutra sind die Namen der Früchte — —, die Deminutive — —;
mit Ausnahme der weiblichen Eigennamen in Deminutivform, als ἡ Λεόντιον, ἡ Γλυκέριον; — —
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Jan 28, 2018 10:35 am

Timothée wrote:You should use better grammars than Smyth.

I should be a better user of Smyth!

199.d.note wrote:But some names of women end in -ιον: ἡ Γλυκέριον Glycerium.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby Timothée » Sun Jan 28, 2018 11:03 am

And Smyth has taken that straight out of Kühner, as you probably knew/guessed.

This grammar point is (of course) mentioned also in Schwyzer—Debrunner, p. 37.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Jan 28, 2018 5:31 pm

Timothée wrote:And Smyth has taken that straight out of Kühner, as you probably knew/guessed.

Taking from others is commonplace.

Is the authority ἡ Γλυκέριον ultimately derived from Lucian's Dialogues of the Courtesans 1, or are there other examples?

In that first dualogue, the name of the character is Γλυκέρα, while she is addressed by the other hooker by the (presumably) familiar Γλυκέριον. So far as I can see, Γλυκέριον is not grammaticalised as feminine, by either article, participle or adjective in that dialogue. [In my opinion, Γλυκέρα / Γλυκέριον "sugar-thing" sounds like a working name.]
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby Timothée » Sun Jan 28, 2018 5:52 pm

ἑκηβόλος wrote:
Timothée wrote:And Smyth has taken that straight out of Kühner, as you probably knew/guessed.

Taking from others is commonplace.

I think you may have misunderstood my point. It has been noted previously on these forums (by other commentators) that Smyth is all but an abridged version of Kühner. It could even be considered a plagiarisation of Kühner. I haven done only very little comparing myself, as I never use Smyth, but it’s always “fun” to note these points when they pop up, as I did in my previous comment.

Schwyzer and Debrunner mention also ἡ Ἀβρότονον and ἡ Βοΐδιον, and note similar features in Latin comedy, citing as an example mea Phronesium.
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Re: Declension - ἡ Λυκαίνιον, τῇ Λυκαινίῳ Longus 3.15.2, 3.1

Postby ἑκηβόλος » Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:33 pm

Timothée wrote:
ἑκηβόλος wrote:
Timothée wrote:And Smyth has taken that straight out of Kühner, as you probably knew/guessed.

Taking from others is commonplace.

I think you may have misunderstood my point.

Completely missed it more likely. I had been of the opinion that because many of the example sentences were the same, that Smyth's work was indebted to his predecessor Goodwin's.
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