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second person plural pronoun

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second person plural pronoun

Postby arkadi » Thu Aug 11, 2005 1:35 am

Could it be used to address a singular person (like English "you")?
If so, did it have the connotation of politeness/respect (like German "Sie")?
Thanks in advance.
Arkadi
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Postby annis » Thu Aug 11, 2005 1:44 am

Nope. A single individual was always [face=spionic]su/[/face]. The 2nd plural was only for more than one person.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Thanks!

Postby arkadi » Thu Aug 11, 2005 2:25 am

A somewhat related question meanwhile came up.
Plato, _Symposion_, 174 a3--"hoi So^krate^".
Why "hoi" here? Is it Attic (as dative)?
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Re: Thanks!

Postby Paul » Thu Aug 11, 2005 4:09 pm

arkadi wrote:A somewhat related question meanwhile came up.
Plato, _Symposion_, 174 a3--"hoi So^krate^".
Why "hoi" here? Is it Attic (as dative)?


Hi,

It's the dative singular of the 3rd personal pronoun.

[face=SPIonic]Swkra/th[/face] is, I think, an accusative. If we take it as the subject of the infinitive, then [face=SPIonic]oi([/face] means 'with him', i.e., "For he said Socrates to meet with him...'

Cordially,

Paul
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Postby arkadi » Thu Aug 11, 2005 4:22 pm

"him"=the speaker?
Oh, I see... I was misled by translations, which all have: "He said that he met with Socrates..." (vel sim.).
Thanks a lot.
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Postby Thucydides » Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:29 pm

While we're on the accuasative of Socrates, is there any good reason that Demosthenes and Socrates have an eta in the accusative but Pericles an (uncontracted) alpha and epsilon? All I can think of is possibly the force of a digamma hanging around in Periklewos and preventing contraction.
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Postby annis » Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:53 pm

Thucydides wrote:While we're on the accuasative of Socrates, is there any good reason that Demosthenes and Socrates have an eta in the accusative but Pericles an (uncontracted) alpha and epsilon? All I can think of is possibly the force of a digamma hanging around in Periklewos and preventing contraction.


Is the name a compound of [face=spionic]peri/[/face] "exceeding" and [face=spionic]kle/oj[/face] "fame, repute"? That would bring digamma in.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Postby Thucydides » Thu Aug 11, 2005 9:54 pm

Yeah that's what I was thinking.
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