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adelphòs

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adelphòs

Postby Misopogon » Fri May 20, 2005 2:08 pm

some time ago I read or heard somewhere that there are two Greek words to mean brother. Adelphòs should mean specifically brother of the same mother (from delphys), but I cannot recall the other word and I have only a monolingual dictionary Greek-Italian at the moment.
Can anyone help me?
Thanks
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Postby Bombichka » Fri May 20, 2005 4:09 pm

I think that the word you're searching could be [face=SPIonic]frath/r[/face], which is the inherited common Indo-european root for "brother" but has specified its meaning in Greek and signifies "a member of a religious or local brotherhood" ([face=SPIonic]fratri/a[/face])
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Postby whiteoctave » Fri May 20, 2005 6:07 pm

[face=SPIonic]kasi/gnhtos [/face]seems a more likely candidate.

~D
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Postby Misopogon » Wed May 25, 2005 9:00 pm

Thanks, it could be, but I am not sure. Anyway I am trying to find where I read it. My memory doesn't work properly.. :cry:
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Postby amans » Wed May 25, 2005 10:52 pm

Ciao Misopogon, come stai?

I'll give that one a shot. Let me list some words for you to consider - perhaps the particular term you are looking for might be among them...

I have taken them from the online English - Greek dictionary by S. C. Woodhouse at:

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/Woodhouse/

It is easy to use and a great resource indeed. Try it out :)

Here are the words for brother:

[face=spionic]kasij

o(/maimoj

o(mai/mwn

o(mo/sporoj

o(mo/splagxnoj

su/ggonoj

su/naimoj

au)ta/delfoj

au)qo/maimoj[/face]


And of course

[face=spionic]kasi/gnhtoj[/face] as whiteoctave said

[face=spionic]a)delfo/j[/face] as you yourself pointed out

Now, these terms may not all carry the same meaning. If you find the word you're looking for, let us know.


Tanti saluti.
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Postby amans » Wed May 25, 2005 10:58 pm

Oh, a PS: you must mean a bilingual dictionary, no? :lol: English - Greek and Greek - English are both bilingual whereas Greek - Greek is monolingual... I suppose what you meant was a dictionary translating from the modern language into Ancient Greek. Such dictionaries are not in such high demand, as reading rather than composition is the skill taught in schools of today...
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Postby Misopogon » Wed May 25, 2005 11:16 pm

amans wrote:Oh, a PS: you must mean a bilingual dictionary, no? :lol: English - Greek and Greek - English are both bilingual whereas Greek - Greek is monolingual... I suppose what you meant was a dictionary translating from the modern language into Ancient Greek. Such dictionaries are not in such high demand, as reading rather than composition is the skill taught in schools of today...


Thanks for the link. Yes you're right , it was a lapsus calami, I mean I have only an Greek-Italian dictionary :lol: .
As far I know there aren't many Italian-Ancient Greek dictionary available, if any. The last I saw was published in the thirties.
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Postby amans » Wed May 25, 2005 11:49 pm

You're welcome. I don't know about Italian - Ancient Greek (however much I love your native language, Misopogon :)), but there's also the Menge-Güthling (German - Ancient Greek) and the Alexandre et al. (French - Ancient Greek). I wouldn't count on finding recent dictionaries translating from modern languages into Ancient Greek, as Greek composition, ut ante dixi, was probably more a 19th century and before discipline...
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