Textkit Logo

'The book is on the table.'

Here's where you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

'The book is on the table.'

Postby Psilord79 » Sat Mar 05, 2005 6:46 pm

Hello, everyone, first message here.

I come from a language-related community called Unilang, and one of the things members there like doing is compiling lists of translations (on different topics) in different languages. Well, one of the sentences that showed up once was the basic 'The book is on the table.' (as another member there defined it, [...] this expression is a kind of "Hello World!" for natural languages [...].). We already had the Modern Greek translation:

[face=SPIonic]To bibli/o ei/nai pa/nw sto trape/zi.[/face]

But I wondered what it'd be like in Classical Greek, too, and asked for a Greek member if he'd be able to come up with something. This is what he got:

[face=SPIonic]To\ bibli/on e)pi\ th=j trape/zhj e(stin.[/face]

He himself said it should be checked, though.

Well, I myself am actually a Modern Greek student, and I know only very few points about Classical (or even Koine) grammar; however, this is a quote from my reply to him regarding the sentence, based on what I know (or think I do):

My grammar book says that, since [face=SPIonic]e(sti[/face]([face=SPIonic]n[/face]) (I love this concept of nu movable, hehe) is an enclitic, it'd usually get no stress indeed; however, it says that enclitics after a paroxytone retain their original stress, so that you won't have three unstressed syllables after the final stress. Based on that, I'd believe it to be [face=SPIonic]e(sti/[/face]([face=SPIonic]n[/face]) then. However, my grammar book also adds that [face=SPIonic]e(sti/[/face]([face=SPIonic]n[/face]), when used enclitically and when signifying existence (or possibility), becomes [face=SPIonic]e(/sti[/face]([face=SPIonic]n[/face]). So, what do you think—[face=SPIonic]e(stin[/face], [face=SPIonic]e(sti/n[/face] or [face=SPIonic]e(/stin[/face] after all?

So, could anyone please share some views on this topic (even if to suggest a totally different translation or something)?

Thank you in advance!

Oh, and in case someone wonders, the list with the translations can be found here.
User avatar
Psilord79
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:30 am
Location: Cândido Mota, São Paulo, Brazil

Re: 'The book is on the table.'

Postby Skylax » Sun Mar 06, 2005 8:42 pm

Psilord79 wrote:So, what do you think—[face=SPIonic]e(stin[/face], [face=SPIonic]e(sti/n[/face] or [face=SPIonic]e(/stin[/face] after all?



It should be [face=SPIonic]e)sti/n[/face], with a soft breathing, an acute accent on the iota (as you said) and a nu movable (as you like).
User avatar
Skylax
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 8:18 am
Location: Belgium

Re: 'The book is on the table.'

Postby Psilord79 » Sun Mar 06, 2005 10:07 pm

Skylax wrote:It should be [face=SPIonic]e)sti/n[/face], with a soft breathing, an acute accent on the iota (as you said) and a nu movable (as you like).

Ah, sorry about the wrong breathing—I'm often mixing things up when encoding it for SPIonic. :oops:

*writes [face=SPIonic]e)sti/n[/face] 1000 times on the blackboard*

And thanks for the confirmation. :)
phpbb
User avatar
Psilord79
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:30 am
Location: Cândido Mota, São Paulo, Brazil

Re: 'The book is on the table.'

Postby Kopio » Mon Mar 07, 2005 4:15 am

If you wanted you could even leave out the [face=SPIonic]e)sti/n[/face], as it is elided quite often....that would really mess with them!!

I remember being a first year greek student and looking for a verb and not finding it......I thought, "Hey what the heck?" Of course, the down side would be that you don't have that spiffy mouvable nu, but remember, no nu-s is good nu-s! (sorry, couldn't help myself)
User avatar
Kopio
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 785
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2004 7:56 pm
Location: Boise, ID


Return to Learning Greek

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Paul Derouda and 105 guests

cron