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e^ d' he^

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e^ d' he^

Postby arkadi » Thu Feb 03, 2005 6:52 pm

Hi everybody:
I' interested in the literal meaning of the locution in the subj., as found, e.g. in Plato, _Symp._ 206 a3, 205 c4.
The meaning is not a problem (translations are available), but the exact power of the "he^" here (as accented) puzzles me. None of its meanings that I could find in the dictionaries seems to fit.
Many thanks for any suggestions.
Arkadi
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Postby Paul » Thu Feb 03, 2005 11:41 pm

Hi,

[face=SPIonic]h)= d' h(/[/face]

Literally, this means 'and said she':

[face=SPIonic]h)=[/face] - 3rd singular, imperfect, indicative, active of [face=SPIonic]h)mi/[/face]. 'He, she, it was saying or said'.

[face=SPIonic]h(/[/face] - feminine, nominative, singular of the relative pronoun. Seems to function here like personal pronoun, 'she'.

At least that's how it seems to me for now.

Cordially,

Paul
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Postby arkadi » Thu Feb 03, 2005 11:54 pm

Thanks! Strangely, this did not occur to me....
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Postby annis » Fri Feb 04, 2005 12:01 am

Paul wrote:[face=SPIonic]h)=[/face] - 3rd singular, imperfect, indicative, active of [face=SPIonic]h)mi/[/face]. 'He, she, it was saying or said'.


Is this word frequent in Plato?
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Postby arkadi » Fri Feb 04, 2005 12:09 am

Yes, it occurs in the same context, but in the first person. Yet. for some irrational reason I took "e^" here to mean "in truth, truly, verily, of a surety" (indeclform), and "d'" to stand for for "de^".
My apologies for this silly question.
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