Textkit Logo

J-B gail ancient greek alphabet abbreviations and liaisons

Here's where you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

J-B gail ancient greek alphabet abbreviations and liaisons

Postby egein » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:01 am

I have a french book written by J-B gail, from the imperial university (france, 1814) which I use for grammar.

But now, I bought my self the Hurbert Weig Smyth's grammar, and I am confused.

In the first book, there are as many as 80 liaisons and abbreviations for letters, such as sðên, chðên, taîs and so on. They look all very nice and are complexe and bizzard mix of symboles. most with êta actualy show epsilon.

Also, bêta, delta, gamma, zêta, ðêta, pi, rho, sigma, tau and phi have up to 3 different forms, all used at determinated points in the word, just like accents are put over vowels. and I find allthis most interesting. but my probleme is that I find no where on the internet that mentions this perticular version of the alphabet.
The grammar is attic.

if someone could help me on this one...


thanks...

Oh by the way. My first post here.

Call me tòn egeîn :D
egein
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2004 3:52 am

Re: J-B gail ancient greek alphabet abbreviations and liaiso

Postby annis » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:30 am

egein wrote: and I find all this most interesting. but my probleme is that I find no where on the internet that mentions this perticular version of the alphabet.


Because no one uses it any more. All the different ligatures and different letter forms aren't used in modern editions of books (well, except for the two sigmas). I have run across modern fonts with two thetas and two betas.

All these ligatures reflect Byzantine scribal practice. I've only ever seen them used in books printed on the continent before the mid 1800s (this is a small sample size; the real distribution may be different). Thanks to a brief exposure to an early French edition of Anacrontics, when I write quickly for my own notes I use the swooping medial sigma-tau ligature, but I'm sure most classics professors not into palaeography wouldn't be able to read this.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
annis
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3397
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Madison, WI, USA

Postby egein » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:45 am

but the ou ligature was so nice....

it looked like a dwarf gamma.
egein
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2004 3:52 am


Return to Learning Greek

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Bob1016, Calgacus, Google Adsense [Bot], jaihare and 27 guests