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Greek Vocab

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Greek Vocab

Postby Sunshine » Mon Nov 29, 2004 4:04 am

Hey guys,

Im new here. I was jus wondering about the vocab tool page. It looks like there's only latin vocab stuff on there, or is it just me?. Anywhere I can find Greek vocab?

Thanks. :wink:
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Postby Eureka » Mon Nov 29, 2004 5:39 am

Hello Sunshine.


There isn't yet any Greek vocab. (Something about not being able to send accented Greek letters via email, I think.)

Maybe someday, I guess.
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Postby Sunshine » Mon Nov 29, 2004 6:38 am

:roll: oh i c. Thanks for your help Eureka! 8)
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Postby Sunshine » Mon Nov 29, 2004 7:30 am

Another question... is there a difference between hellenic, old testament, new testament and ancient greek?? Or is it all jus the same thing with different names.
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Postby Eureka » Mon Nov 29, 2004 9:45 am

Sunshine wrote:Another question... is there a difference between hellenic, old testament, new testament and ancient greek?? Or is it all jus the same thing with different names.

There are basically three eras (that we have here):


Ancient - The time of Homer. Homeric Greek is a poetic dialect from that time.

Classical - The golden age. Each city had its own dialect at that time. Attic Greek is the dialect of Athens at this time.

Hellenistic/Roman - Post Alexander the Great. One dialect was basically used throughout the Greek world: Koine Greek.
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Postby Bert » Mon Nov 29, 2004 2:12 pm

Eureka wrote:
Sunshine wrote:Another question... is there a difference between hellenic, old testament, new testament and ancient greek?? Or is it all jus the same thing with different names.

There are basically three eras (that we have here):


Ancient - The time of Homer. Homeric Greek is a poetic dialect from that time.

Classical - The golden age. Each city had its own dialect at that time. Attic Greek is the dialect of Athens at this time.

Hellenistic/Roman - Post Alexander the Great. One dialect was basically used throughout the Greek world: Koine Greek.

I call all these three Ancient Greek and divide them into Homeric, Classical, and Koine.
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Postby chrisb » Mon Nov 29, 2004 8:16 pm

The Greek word list for English and Welsh AS level exams is available at

www.etoncollege.com

in a handy pdf file. Select Eton in Action from the first menu and Greek Project from the second.

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Postby Sunshine » Tue Nov 30, 2004 7:35 am

You guys are awsome! :wink: Thank you so much
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Postby Eureka » Tue Nov 30, 2004 9:12 am

Bert wrote:I call all these three Ancient Greek and divide them into Homeric, Classical, and Koine.

That's what I would call them too, but unfortunately, I think someone had already named them before I got there. :wink:
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Postby Bert » Tue Nov 30, 2004 3:17 pm

Eureka wrote:
Bert wrote:I call all these three Ancient Greek and divide them into Homeric, Classical, and Koine.

That's what I would call them too, but unfortunately, I think someone had already named them before I got there. :wink:

Me :?: :)
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Postby Geoff » Tue Nov 30, 2004 7:40 pm

Here is a link to a PDF containing all the words in the New Testament occuring more than 50 times. This accounts for something like %80-%90 of word occurences in the NT.

http://faculty.bbc.edu/rdecker/documents/elgkvoc.pdf

Look at some of the other resources on his site for additional study helps
http://faculty.bbc.edu/rdecker/default.htm

There is an intermediate vocabulary which includes the words used 10 or more times http://faculty.bbc.edu/rdecker/document ... ssignU.pdf
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Postby Geoff » Tue Nov 30, 2004 7:42 pm

Oh yeah,

welcome to textkit, what's your interest in Greek?
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Postby Sunshine » Wed Dec 01, 2004 3:55 am

Thanks for the links and the welcome. My goal ultimately is to read the greek version of the bible. There's so many different interpretations out there, n I thought it would be neat to read the earlier texts for myself. :)

I also do classics at college.

And y'self? 8)
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Postby Geoff » Wed Dec 01, 2004 4:32 am

Great, good idea about reading the Bible in Greek, it can help you avoid many common mistakes. Someone studying classics of course will know that context is still the final authority.

I'm a Bible student, but my Greek is little. I'd eventually like to read some Marcus Aurelius, and Aristotle later, but those are way out my reach right now. I'll just work on my NT reading skills for some time.

Check out Samuel Green's grammar here at textkit, its one of my favorites and a great supplement to William Mounce's Basics of Biblical Greek. Think about reading the NT first then look at the OT LXX in Greek. The OT was originally written in Hebrew.
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Postby Sunshine » Wed Dec 01, 2004 4:45 am

Cool. It's nice to be around people who share the same interests. :D

Yeh it seems like most people start with the NT. I had downloaded and made a start with White's book.

What would you recommend... should I just start with the books specifically for the NT like Mounces or should I use both books?
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Postby Eureka » Wed Dec 01, 2004 5:45 am

Sunshine wrote:Cool. It's nice to be around people who share the same interests. :D

Yeh it seems like most people start with the NT. I had downloaded and made a start with White's book.

What would you recommend... should I just start with the books specifically for the NT like Mounces or should I use both books?

If you want to be able to read both Attic and Koine, it's best to start with Attic, because it's easy to go from Attic to Koine, but not the other way round.
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Postby chrisb » Wed Dec 01, 2004 9:48 am

If you want to read the NT, a very good site to start off with might be:

http://www.btinternet.com/~mispar/GNotes/

The whole of the NT is there, in Greek, split into weekly study sections. The text is not translated for you, but there are good notes on vocabulary.

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