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A Greek Boy at Home

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A Greek Boy at Home

Postby Bert » Wed Nov 17, 2004 10:47 pm

The deadline job completed, I can spend a bit more time reading Greek.
I ran across a few problems that require some help.
The story I'm reading is called: a Greek Boy at Home.
1. In my first difficulty the Greek boy gives a description of some of the wildlife in the forest.
[face=SPIonic]a)/gria ou)=n tau=ta ta\ de/ndra, a)/grioi de\ kai\ oi( drumoi/.
e)n de\ th=| u(/lh| kai\ dh\ kai\ e)n toi=j drumoi=j ma/lista oi)kei= ta\ a)/gria zw=|a, peri\ w(=n us(/steron.
[/face]

The first part does not make a lot of sense to me; These trees then are wild, wild but also shrubs (undergrowth).
The next sentence; But in the bush but also in the undergrowth especially live the wildlife,....I don't understand [face=SPIonic]peri\ w(=n us(/steron.[/face] at all.

2.My second problem is when the boy describes how they raise birds (Chickens, I quess) for the eggs. He then says; [face=SPIonic]w)\ tou= filanqrw/pou o)rniqi/ou[/face]
Oh mankind loving birds or Oh kind birds
My translation is as if it was Vocative, but it is in the Genitive.
What's happening?
Bert
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Re: A Greek Boy at Home

Postby annis » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:18 am

Bert wrote:I don't understand [face=SPIonic]peri\ w(=n us(/steron.[/face] at all.


"About which later" I think.

2.My second problem is when the boy describes how they raise birds (Chickens, I quess) for the eggs. He then says; [face=SPIonic]w)\ tou= filanqrw/pou o)rniqi/ou[/face]
Oh mankind loving birds or Oh kind birds
My translation is as if it was Vocative, but it is in the Genitive.
What's happening?


"Oh, what human-loving birds!" is what I'd say. Smyth 1407, though the L&S says that it [face=spionic]w)/[/face] can take vocative (which seems more usual) or genitive.
EDIT: Goodwin 1124, "The genitive is sometimes used in exclamations, to give the cause of the astonishment."
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Postby ThomasGR » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:54 pm

drumos = forest
a)/gria ou)=n tau=ta ta\ de/ndra, a)/grioi de\ kai\ oi( drumoi/.

Wild are these trees, but wild are forests as well.
w)\ tou= filanqrw/pou o)rniqi/ou

I think it must be in genitive, and belongs to follwing part of the sentence. E.g. [....] of the human-loving birds.
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Postby Bert » Thu Nov 18, 2004 6:24 pm

ThomasGR wrote:drumos = forest
[face=SPIonic]a)/gria ou)=n tau=ta ta\ de/ndra, a)/grioi de\ kai\ oi( drumoi/[/face].

Wild are these trees, but wild are forests as well.


Is DRUMOS synonymous to hULH?
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Postby Skylax » Thu Nov 18, 2004 8:05 pm

Bert wrote:Is DRUMOS synonymous to hULH?


Yes, more or less, for it means "coppice, thicket"
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