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Kallisti

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Kallisti

Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:43 pm

I know absolutely nothing about Greek except for the alphabet and some English roots, but I am curious, is '[face=SPIonic]kallisti[/face]' the dative superlative of the word for 'fair' (i.e. 'to the fairest')?
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Re: Kallisti

Postby annis » Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:52 pm

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:I know absolutely nothing about Greek except for the alphabet and some English roots, but I am curious, is '[face=SPIonic]kallisti[/face]' the dative superlative of the word for 'fair' (i.e. 'to the fairest')?


I'm afraid not, though very close. It's an error propogated by Discordians. :)

For the golden apples story it should be [face=spionic]kalli/sth|[/face].
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Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Mon Aug 09, 2004 10:01 pm

I see. That iota subscript doesn't change the pronunciation at all, correct? So, kalliste, with the all pronounced like the English 'all', and a short 'i'? But how would the eta be pronounced?

Is the formation of the superlative for kalos regular? Where do the extra lambda and the sigma come from?

[edit]I see the sigma is regular in 'adjectives of the second form'. I also see that those adjectives usually have their stem modified in the comparative and superlative. Must one simply memorize these changes?[/edit]
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Postby annis » Mon Aug 09, 2004 11:10 pm

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:I see. That iota subscript doesn't change the pronunciation at all, correct? So, kalliste, with the all pronounced like the English 'all', and a short 'i'? But how would the eta be pronounced?


Probably most like reality 500BC: like a drawn out 'ehhh' as in 'set'. Most people don't pronounce iota subscript, but if you're feeling archaic, finish off the 'ehhh' with a iota sound (ee, 'feel') at the end to get the basic feel.

However, most people using Erasmian pronunciation (conventional for some time now) pronounce eta like 'ay' in 'day'.

The iota is pronounced the same no matter where it is, so absolutely not like the short 'i' in 'sit'. Think 'seat', just quickly. Native English speakers naturally shorten that to 'sit' here, so I imagine most English-speaking classics profs even pronounce it that way.

[edit]I see the sigma is regular in 'adjectives of the second form'. I also see that those adjectives usually have their stem modified in the comparative and superlative. Must one simply memorize these changes?[/edit]


Yep. Most adjectives are regular, fortunately.
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Postby Titus Marius Crispus » Tue Aug 10, 2004 2:18 am

Thanks! I'm off to the PD forums to tell people.
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Postby Skylax » Tue Aug 10, 2004 7:56 pm

Titus Marius Crispus wrote:Is the formation of the superlative for kalos regular? Where do the extra lambda and the sigma come from?

[edit]I see the sigma is regular in 'adjectives of the second form'. I also see that those adjectives usually have their stem modified in the comparative and superlative. Must one simply memorize these changes?[/edit]


The extra lambda could come from an influence of the noun to kallos "beauty", but nobody knows why there is a second lambda in to kallos...

About eta changing into i, hence kallisti from kalliste with a fina eta : this is a phenomenon called iotacism, which happened earlier that I ever thought, namely already between fifth and third century B. C. (I thought it was only A.D. !! see - unfortunately in French - http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iotacisme) : ei, oi u psilon and eta became then i in the pronunciation, - but not in the writing.

So kallisti is the newer pronunciation of kalliste

Now [face=SPIonic]xai=re[/face], as I always say.
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