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Pictorial Ancient Greek Project --- a sketch

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Pictorial Ancient Greek Project --- a sketch

Postby mingshey » Fri Feb 13, 2004 4:28 am

In order to enhance my vocab power in AG, I tried to harvest some words from the woodhouse E-G dictionary and put them around a few pictures. And I found a number of interesting words.

roof is [face=SPIonic]o( o)/rofoj[/face] while the ceiling is [face=SPIonic]h( o)rofh/[/face],
wall is [face=SPIonic]to\ tei=xoj[/face] while the wall of a house is [face=SPIonic]o( toi=xoj[/face],
door is [face=SPIonic]h( qu/ra[/face] when window is [face=SPIonic]h( quri/j[/face],
cabbage is [face=SPIonic]h( r(a/fanoj[/face] while radish is [face=SPIonic]h( r(afani/j[/face],
and spicy is [face=SPIonic]h(di/j[/face] where sweet is [face=SPIonic]h(du/j[/face].

I think I'd be going to photocopy the pictures from my Pictorial German-English Dictionary and fill it in with the AG words. --- Er, I'm not going to publish it. It's for my study only. ;)


By the way, I couldn't find a single mentioning of Katharevousa dictionary on the web(including Amazon sites). Was there such a thing?
Last edited by mingshey on Fri Feb 13, 2004 4:46 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby chad » Fri Feb 13, 2004 4:36 am

that's awesome mingshey, when you (don't) publish it could you please (not) send me a copy or link :) ;)

if you get really stupid pictures you won't forget the vocab. i did something similar with latin... i found bizarre pictures for ideas which "sounded" very similar to the words of a famous speech in latin. (i was trying to memorise a large slab of latin prose). i still can't erase the speech from my mind.

the pictures (or combinations of pictures) resembled:

"crooks on tandem (bicycle)" "a blue terrier catilina!" "patient's nostrils"
"come deal at (this) ATM" "Fuhrer is a tourist" "nose is looted"....

i found the most bizarre pictures for these from images.google.com... :)
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Postby mingshey » Fri Feb 13, 2004 5:24 am

chad wrote:the pictures (or combinations of pictures) resembled:

"crooks on tandem (bicycle)" "a blue terrier catilina!" "patient's nostrils"
"come deal at (this) ATM" "Fuhrer is a tourist" "nose is looted"....

i found the most bizarre pictures for these from images.google.com... :)


LOL, Though I wouldn't know what a blue terrier catillina is, I think I get your point. Puns like "high pot in use" and "gee I'm a tree" also help the memory.

I once tried tagging various things in my room with Modern Greek names. It didn't last long, but ypologisths, and plyktrologio, etc sticked to my tongue. :D
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Postby chad » Fri Feb 13, 2004 5:27 am

i got that famous picture of cicero in the senate and catiline off in the corner, then typed in "blue terrier" into images.google.com and crazily enough, there actually was a picture of a blue terrier (which i pasted into the senate) :)
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Postby mingshey » Fri Feb 13, 2004 5:41 am

Is it this?

http://www.skidmore.edu/academics/class ... nounce.jpg


Then the posture of a man that I assume to be catiline would fit to stroke a doggie! LOLer
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Postby chad » Fri Feb 13, 2004 5:49 am

yeah that pic, i had catiline staring at this unnatural blue dog... :)

i also had pics of e.g. hitler and the eiffel tower, some lady in south east asia selling a strung-up animal near an ATM, a pic of some greek relief with the nose smashed off, &c &c.

mix that with the sound of a harvard professor reading out the speech (from online), and it's really easy to memorise :)
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Postby mingshey » Sat Feb 14, 2004 3:07 am

And the speech must have been this? :)

quo usque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra? quam diu etiam furor iste tuus nos eludet?

from "Orationes in Catilinam" by Cicero.


Found this in Perseus with the picture (and the name Catilina) as a clue.
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Postby benissimus » Sat Feb 14, 2004 5:46 am

That picture is my desktop background! :twisted: It captures his shame so well...
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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