Textkit Logo

Conversational Classical Greek

Here's where you can discuss all things Ancient Greek. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Conversational Classical Greek

Postby annis » Wed Jan 14, 2004 12:28 am

Rather than further the hijacking of our modern Greek visitor's introduction, I thought I'd continue some thoughts about this in a new thread.

mingshey wrote:Learning the poems by heart might help. But poems are more free from normal grammar, isn't it true for greek, too?


Quite. Still good for vocabulary, though any Greek prose you compose may have more poetic vocabulary than Aristotle would approve of. Even with the poetic freedoms, though, the basics (agreement, aspect/tense, much morphology) will be the same.

How about those drama scripts as by Aeschilos or other authors? Are they recommendable for learning normal conversational grammar and vocabulary?


Probably the dialogues of Plato and Lucian would be the best. The Attic of drama is still quite poetic.

Just a snippet:

As discussed on the classics list today, apparently one correct response to [face=spionic]xai=re[/face] is [face=spionic]kai\ su/[/face]. In the right context, it might also be considered rude, I gather.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
annis
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3397
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Madison, WI, USA

Postby chad » Wed Jan 14, 2004 12:44 am

a little thing i noticed while flicking thru the loeb papyri: private letters volume is that greeks writing casual letters to each other always started the same way: A to B [face=SPIonic]xai/rein[/face], the verbal noun, rather than [face=SPIonic]xai=re[/face], i.e. in spoken conversation they said something like "hi A", but in written conversation, "A to B greetings". the openings and closings of those papyrus letters seem as formulaic as "dear x" and "yours sincerely".
chad
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 757
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 2:55 am

Postby annis » Wed Jan 14, 2004 4:12 am

chad wrote:a little thing i noticed while flicking thru the loeb papyri: private letters volume is that greeks writing casual letters to each other always started the same way: A to B [face=SPIonic]xai/rein[/face], the verbal noun,


A whole mess o' salutations in Greek and Latin: Classical Salutations and Closings
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
annis
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3397
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Madison, WI, USA

Postby benissimus » Wed Jan 14, 2004 5:30 am

That's a really interesting site, you should mention it in the links forum 8)
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby Emma_85 » Wed Jan 14, 2004 1:02 pm

I've noticed that learning things of by heart does help me for Greek. We had to learn the first few lines of the Odyssey off by heart, and I know all the vocab used there, maybe all I need to do to learn vocab is learn more of the Odyssey off by heart. It might help me if I try to copy out the Odyssey in nice handwriting, too.
phpbb
User avatar
Emma_85
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:01 pm
Location: London

Re: Conversational Classical Greek

Postby Kerastes » Sat Jan 31, 2004 10:45 pm

annis wrote:As discussed on the classics list today, apparently one correct response to [face=spionic]xai=re[/face] is [face=spionic]kai\ su/[/face]. In the right context, it might also be considered rude, I gather.


This exchange occurs in E. Joannides, Sprechen Sie Attisch? (Leipzig, 1889):

Guten Morgen, Karl! Good morning, Karl. [face=SPIonic] xai=r' w)= Ka/role.[/face]

Guten Morgen, Gustav! (Erwiderung) Good morning, Gustav. (reply) [face=SPIonic]kai\ su/ge w)= Gou/stabe.[/face]

It's an interesting little booklet. Anyone else ever seen it?

Kerastes
Kerastes
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 9:16 pm
Location: Rantoul, IL USA

Re: Conversational Classical Greek

Postby mingshey » Sun Feb 01, 2004 1:12 am

Kerastes wrote:This exchange occurs in E. Joannides, Sprechen Sie Attisch? (Leipzig, 1889):


Must be in the public domain?
Many, including me, will be very grateful if it shows up on the textkit. :D
User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 1332
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul

Postby benissimus » Sun Feb 01, 2004 1:16 am

If you speak German... :?
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby annis » Sun Feb 01, 2004 4:00 am

benissimus wrote:If you speak German... :?


It is called a booklet. Surely it would not be much work to translate.

(Assuming enough readers of fraktur, of course. :) )
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
annis
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3397
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Madison, WI, USA

Postby Kerastes » Sun Feb 01, 2004 4:17 pm

annis wrote:Surely it would not be much work to translate.
(Assuming enough readers of fraktur, of course. :) )


You've seen it, then. Yeah, fraktur, my favorite. :roll:

It's only 68 pages. I'm eventually going to translate it and post it publicly, to make it more accessible, but my capacity to commit is a bit uncertain right now. I'm eyeing either of the two Homeric study groups, but I'm not sure I can follow through or even which one to join. As you can tell, I'm new here.

Not for nothing is my Internet name Kerastes Polythymos.
Kerastes
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 9:16 pm
Location: Rantoul, IL USA

Postby annis » Sun Feb 01, 2004 10:22 pm

Kerastes wrote:You've seen it, then. Yeah, fraktur, my favorite. :roll:


I've not seen it, but assumed it would be in fraktur based on the publishing date.

It's only 68 pages. I'm eventually going to translate it and post it publicly, to make it more accessible, but my capacity to commit is a bit uncertain right now.


I don't know about your computer hardware circumstances, but scanning a few pages a week and putting them up on a web page would, I'm sure, inspire the German speakers to give us translated text.

I'm eyeing either of the two Homeric study groups, but I'm not sure I can follow through or even which one to join. As you can tell, I'm new here.


Welcome!
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
annis
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3397
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:55 pm
Location: Madison, WI, USA

Postby mingshey » Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:05 am

annis wrote:(Assuming enough readers of fraktur, of course. :) )


Fraktur is no problem(We have a fraktur Greek grammar recently posted by Waraysa in the outside links forum ;)). I love it. But my limited german can be a little problem.
User avatar
mingshey
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 1332
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:38 am
Location: Seoul


Return to Learning Greek

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bedwere, Google [Bot], mahasacham, Qimmik, TheElk and 77 guests