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Ulysses and the Cyclops

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Ulysses and the Cyclops

Postby phil » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:09 am

Hi All,

In one of the 38 stories, Ulysses and the Cyclops there is this line:
"Quid vos, tu tuique cari, mihi dabitis?"
I get
"What will you(pl), you(sg) and your(sg) dears, give me?"
Dears?!? Can that be right?
Cheers
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Re: Ulysses and the Cyclops

Postby benissimus » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:25 am

more idiomatic might be "those dear to you", i.e. your companions
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Re: Ulysses and the Cyclops

Postby phil » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:59 pm

Thanks. It threw me that a great ugly monster in a cave would use the word cari, rather than something like amici or comites when describing a dozen or so cheese-eating soldiers. It seemed a bit incongruous.
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Re: Ulysses and the Cyclops

Postby tjnor » Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:16 pm

Then again, it is comparable to Tolkien's Gollum and his use of endearments like "My Precious." Dickens had his villian Fagin call members of his gang of thieving boys, "My dear." The irony reinforces the deadly intent behind the words.
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