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A review

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A review

Postby manderson » Tue Feb 13, 2007 4:33 am

It seems that my class is ahead of my brain, so I am trying to review. I am using Dale Grote's website to help break some thoughts down to my level, and sometimes it works pretty well.

Anyway, I just wanted someone to look and see if I am on the right track. This is the chapter that goes over is, ea id for "the". Chapter 11.

They will send you the [this] money.
Eam pecuniam te mittent.

I will give you the money of the [these] men.
Te eam pecunaim eaorum virorum dabo.

The [these] boys are not thinking.
Pueri non cogitant.

I will come iwth the [this] tyrant.
Cum eum tyranum veniam.

That man will discover the [this] plot.
Eam insidiam iste reperiam.

I just want to make sure that I did this right before I move on. Like I said, we are really in Chapter 25 and I am going to die! After I finish this chapter review, I am moving to Chapter 18, which is gonna kick me in the butt. By the way, what does it mean, in simple english, when a verb can take a transitive verb.

Thanks for your patience! I will be back! LOL
manderson
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Re: A review

Postby cdm2003 » Tue Feb 13, 2007 3:40 pm

manderson wrote:It seems that my class is ahead of my brain, so I am trying to review. I am using Dale Grote's website to help break some thoughts down to my level, and sometimes it works pretty well.

Anyway, I just wanted someone to look and see if I am on the right track. This is the chapter that goes over is, ea id for "the". Chapter 11.


Salve MAnderson! Hopefully I can offer a touch of advice here...

They will send you the [this] money.
Eam pecuniam te mittent.

I will give you the money of the [these] men.
Te eam pecunaim eaorum virorum dabo.


In the first, while eam is just fine, tibi is what you want instead of te as "you" is an indirect object.

The second, needs a touch of work: Tibi pecuniam eorum (vel horum) virorum dabo. "You" is an indirect object here and thus takes the dative case. "These" men can be translated either as eorum, the genitive plural of is, or as horum, the genitive plural of hic. The choice is yours depending on the level of intensity you wish to imply. Note the subtlety between "I'll give you their (eorum) money" or "I'll give you the money of these (horum, as opposed to those) men."

The [these] boys are not thinking.
Pueri non cogitant.


Hi pueri or ei pueri with the same understanding about what intensity you wish to convey. Leaving either form of is or hic out means plain old "boys."

I will come iwth the [this] tyrant.
Cum eum tyranum veniam.


Cum takes the ablative: Cum eo tyranno veniam.

That man will discover the [this] plot.
Eam insidiam iste reperiam.


I would choose: Ille [homo] has insidias reperiet. Mind your conjugation of reperio. Eas (note that insidiae is a plural noun) with iste in such a way does make sense, but it would suggest more of "Hurry up and hide those papers Catalline! THAT Cicero guy is coming over here to say hello and he's going to discover THE BIG plot YOU'RE cooking up!" Maybe that's exaggerated :D , but let me reiterate that is/iste can work like you're using it.

I just want to make sure that I did this right before I move on. Like I said, we are really in Chapter 25 and I am going to die! After I finish this chapter review, I am moving to Chapter 18, which is gonna kick me in the butt. By the way, what does it mean, in simple english, when a verb can take a transitive verb.

Thanks for your patience! I will be back! LOL


Take care and great to meet you,
Chris
Horum omnium fortissimi sunt Belgae
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Postby manderson » Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:45 am

In the first, while eam is just fine, tibi is what you want instead of te as "you" is an indirect object.


I even wrote on my paper that 'you' was the indirect object! Too bad when I put in Latin I didn't pay attention!

Tibi pecuniam eorum (vel horum) virorum dabo."

The same goes here. But would you wouldn't ever say eam pecuniam woud you?

Thanks for all the help. I see my mistakes now. They stick out like a sore thumb! I hope I can retain it! Practice, practice, practice!!
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