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Lesson 4, phrases excercises

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Lesson 4, phrases excercises

Postby Hammurabi » Sun Apr 23, 2006 12:13 am

Hi, it's me again :oops: :oops:

I'm going ahead with the wherlock's excercises, I just wanted to see if everything is going all right with my study:

9. You are in great danger.
In magno periculo es.

10. My son's cares are often foolish.
Curae filii mei saepe stulti sunt.

11. The sons of great men are not always great.
Filii virorum magnorum semper magni non sunt.

12. Without wisdom good fortune is nothing.
Fortuna bona sine sapientia nihil est.

Finally some phrases from mine...

Periculi magno viro non terrant.
Dona fortunae sunt puellae.
Beatus sum si philosophiam et sapientiam habeo.
Donum magnum est basium puellae.
Cogitare bonum officium est.

:oops: :oops:

Thank you very much for your help in advance.
8) :lol:
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Postby bellum paxque » Sun Apr 23, 2006 3:05 am

Hi, it's me again


Salve, amice recens!

I'm going ahead with the wherlock's excercises, I just wanted to see if everything is going all right with my study:


Fine!

9. You are in great danger.
In magno periculo es.


Yes. Another way of translating that is magno in periculo es. They mean the same thing, but you should be aware that an adjective and the noun it modifies can and often do sandwich a preposition like that.

10. My son's cares are often foolish.
Curae filii mei saepe stulti sunt.


Yep!

11. The sons of great men are not always great.
Filii virorum magnorum semper magni non sunt.


It's not really a big deal, but ...non semper magni sunt may be preferable. I think that the non is modifying semper, so it should go with it. At least that sounds better to me.

12. Without wisdom good fortune is nothing.
Fortuna bona sine sapientia nihil est.


Fine. Consider keeping the original word order, though (sine sapientia fortuna...

Finally some phrases from mine...

Periculi magno viro non terrant.


You want terrent. It's 2nd conjugation, so the stem vowel is "e." Also, magnum virum is more appropriate: terreo generally takes the accusative case.

Dona fortunae sunt puellae.


"Girls are the gifts of fortune?" Sounds good to me!

Beatus sum si philosophiam et sapientiam habeo.


Spot on!

Donum magnum est basium puellae.


I can vouch for that. sed pueri quoque basium donum est!

Cogitare bonum officium est.


The grammar's fine here, but I'm not quite sure what you mean. Is it, "It is a duty to think a good thing" or "It is a good duty to think?" I might say, bene cogitare officium meum est - "It's my responsibility to think well."

Thank you very much for your help in advance.


Il n'y a pas de quoi - er - nihil laboris ut semper! (no problem, as always!)

cura ut valeas - (take care!)

David
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Postby Hammurabi » Sun Apr 23, 2006 11:51 pm

Thank you for your help pal!!

:D :D :oops: 8)

Multas puellas lauda et ama.
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Postby Iulianus » Mon Apr 24, 2006 12:44 pm

I don't wish to intrude or be rude, but I couldn't help but notice the following:

10. My son's cares are often foolish.
Curae filii mei saepe stulti sunt.



Yep!


shouldn't stulti conform with curae? id est: stultae?

Finally some phrases from mine...

Periculi magno viro non terrant.

You want terrent. It's 2nd conjugation, so the stem vowel is "e." Also, magnum virum is more appropriate: terreo generally takes the accusative case.


In this sentence, I suppose periculi is the subject, correct? Since periculum is neuter, shouldn't the plural be pericula in the nominative?

I hope no offense will be taken, and also that I have made no mistakes while attempting to correct those of others!

Valete,

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Postby bellum paxque » Tue Apr 25, 2006 4:23 am

Er...yes! No offense is taken, only a bit of (well-deserved) shame.

Thank you for catching my mistakes.

-David

PS - Though one could argue that curae filii mei saepe stulti sunt really means "these are the cares of my son, often stupid." ;)
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Postby Iulianus » Tue Apr 25, 2006 5:12 am

Thank you for catching my mistakes.


You are very welcome!

PS - Though one could argue that curae filii mei saepe stulti sunt really means "these are the cares of my son, often stupid." Wink


Indeed, it could!

Vale,

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