Textkit Logo

Did I translate this right?

Are you learning Latin with Wheelock's Latin 6th Edition? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Did I translate this right?

Postby Fabiola » Thu Dec 08, 2005 12:40 am

I just want to make sure I'm translating correctly before I go much further..

Pauci viri verro amicos habent, et pauci sunt digni.

Few men have true friends, and few are deserving. (should that be "deserve them"?)

Amicitia vera est praeclara, et omnia praeclara sunt rara.

True friendship is splendid, and all splendid things are rare.

Multi viri stulti de pecunia semper cogitant, pauci de amicis, sed errant: possumus valere sine multa pecunia, sed sine amicitia non valemus et vita est nihil.

Many foolish men always think about money, but they err; we are able to be strong without much money, but without friendship we have no strength and life is nothing.

If someone could point out the errors and give me some hints so I can see if I can figure out where I went wrong, I'd greatly appreciate it. :)

Also- when you're translating passages with Latin names into English, do you always just write it in the Nominative form of the name?

Thanks!
phpbb
User avatar
Fabiola
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:31 am

Re: Did I translate this right?

Postby benissimus » Thu Dec 08, 2005 3:15 am

Fabiola wrote:Pauci viri verro amicos habent, et pauci sunt digni.

and few are deserving. (should that be "deserve them

Multi viri stulti de pecunia semper cogitant, pauci de amicis, sed errant: possumus valere sine multa pecunia, sed sine amicitia non valemus et vita est nihil.

Many foolish men always think about money, but they err; we are able to be strong without much money, but without friendship we have no strength and life is nothing.

you neglected to translate "pauci de amicis"

Also- when you're translating passages with Latin names into English, do you always just write it in the Nominative form of the name?

Usually the nominative... certainly don't leave it in whatever case form it happens to be in the Latin sentence as that would be completely inconsistent, not to mention baffle anyone reading your English who doesn't know Latin case forms. Many Latin names have separate English versions, e.g. Catiline (Catilina), Vergil (Publius Vergilius Maro), Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius); in these cases it is customary to use the English version of the name.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby bellum paxque » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:34 am

Pauci viri verro amicos habent


Surely "verro" is a typo for "veros"?

Many Latin names have separate English versions, e.g. Catiline (Catilina), Vergil (Publius Vergilius Maro), Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius); in these cases it is customary to use the English version of the name.


And it is perhaps even more customary to use "Virgil," the most common version of P. Vergilius Maro, even, it seems, in British English. ;)

David
bellum paxque
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2005 2:29 pm
Location: nanun Hanguge issoyo (in Korea sum)

Re: Did I translate this right?

Postby Fabiola » Thu Dec 08, 2005 10:31 pm

Thank you two for replying! :)

benissimus wrote:you neglected to translate "pauci de amicis"


:oops:

"few about friends"

Many foolish men always think about money, few about friends, but they err; we are able to be strong without much money, but without friendship we have no strength and life is nothing.

Surely "verro" is a typo for "veros"?


Yes, sorry! I thought I didn't have any typos.. argh.

Otherwise, my translation is correct?

And thanks for the info on the names! :)
phpbb
User avatar
Fabiola
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:31 am

Postby bellum paxque » Fri Dec 09, 2005 8:39 pm

Nihil laboris est (=you're welcome, cf. the Spanish de nada, the French de rien). You're translation looks fine to me!

David
bellum paxque
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2005 2:29 pm
Location: nanun Hanguge issoyo (in Korea sum)

Postby Fabiola » Fri Dec 09, 2005 9:27 pm

Fantastic. :D Thanks again!
phpbb
User avatar
Fabiola
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:31 am


Return to Wheelock's Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests