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Postby Ni » Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:52 am

1.Agricola et vitam et fortunam nautae saepe laudat.
The farmer , life and fortune often praise sailors.

2Nauta magnam fortunam vitam poetae saepe laudat.
Sailor often praises the life of great fortune.

3Sine philosphia avari viri de pecunia semper cogitant: multam pecuniam habent, sed pecunia multa virum avarum non satiat.
Without physiologists always think the hero's greed for money. They have much money, but money does not satisfy the hero's greed.

My question is as follows:
In the sentence 1, laudat should be deemed as the third person singular, but the subject is plural, why? thanks. :) :lol:
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Postby Kip » Wed Nov 30, 2005 5:12 am

1.Agricola et vitam et fortunam nautae saepe laudat.
The farmer , life and fortune often praise sailors.


Agricola ("farmer" masculine noun) is not plural, but singular.

Vitam (life) and Fortunam (Fortune) are accusitive singular nouns.

Laudet ( he, she, it praises)

Nautae (masculine noun) probably Genitive

My translation would be:

The farmer often praises the life and fortune of the sailor.
Last edited by Kip on Wed Nov 30, 2005 9:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Barrier

Postby Kasper » Wed Nov 30, 2005 5:31 am

Ni wrote:
3Sine philosphia avari viri de pecunia semper cogitant: multam pecuniam habent, sed pecunia multa virum avarum non satiat.
Without physiologists always think the hero's greed for money. They have much money, but money does not satisfy the hero's greed.



In the absence of my physiologist I have often contemplated the hero's insatiable greed for money. Nevertheless, this is not wat your sentence refers to Ni.

I do not doubt that you meant 'philosophy' when you wrote 'physiologist', leaving the only required amendments as follows:

avari viri = greedy men (no heroes involved). 'Avari' is an adjective to 'viri'. 'viri' is not in the genitive case.

The same applies to avarum virum.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Postby Ni » Wed Nov 30, 2005 5:36 pm

But "et...et...et" means and...and....and, they are absolutely compacted. How could it be abstract the word Agricola to serve as a independent subject? why? thanks :(
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Postby Andrus » Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:56 pm

Hi Ni,

Just found this in Words:

"et...et" can be "Both...and...".

We know agricola is the subject because Vitam and Fortunam are in the accusative case so they can't be. Only agricola and nautae could be the subject of the sentence. But as the verb laudat is in the 3rd person singular the subject can only be agricola, since nautae would be plural.

So the sentence would be "The farmer often praises both the life and the luck of the sailor".

Hope this helps and sorry for any English mistake but didn't have the time to check the post.

Best regards,

Andrus

Edit: For cleaning English errors
Last edited by Andrus on Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Kip » Wed Nov 30, 2005 10:50 pm

So the sentence would be "Tha farmer oftens parises both the life and the luck of the sailor".


Yes. That does sound better. I missed the other "et". :oops:
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Postby Ni » Thu Dec 01, 2005 12:39 am

Many thanks, my friends!!!!!!! :D :D
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Postby Ni » Thu Dec 01, 2005 5:49 am

1.Pauci viri veros amicos habent, et pauci sunt digni. Amicitia vera est praeclara, et omnia praeclara sunt rara. Multi viri stulti de pecunia semper cogitant, pauci de amicis: sed errand: possumus valere sine multa pecunia, sed sine amicitia non valemus et vita est nihil.

Post-translated:
A few men have true friends, and few of them are deserving. True friendship is splendid, and all the good things are rare, many stupid people often think about money, few care of friends, but they are wrong. We are able to be strong, without much money, friendship are not stong. and life is nothing.

Puzzlement
amicitia is the singular, why used valemus?Thanks, my friends! :D :?:
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Postby Andrus » Fri Dec 02, 2005 9:50 am

Hi Ni,

First let me say about my last post that I did type it in a hurry so I may have left the impression that everything was very obvious. But the mistake you did I also did many times before the practice made me able to identify better the subjects of sentences. Secondly you did very well when you notice double “et” while I at the beginning totally miss it and only notice it when you point it out. Thanks to you I too discovered the “et…et…” construction that I didn’t know.

My Latin isn’t good enough to analyze your translation but I can answer your question:

Ni wrote:Puzzlement
amicitia is the singular, why used valemus?Thanks, my friends!


“Amicitia” isn’t the subject of the sentence here, in fact the subject is implied by the verb, and it is us, meaning people in general. “Amicitia” is in Ablative case (don’t know if your book indicates the length of vowels, but if it does the last “a” should be long) and it is being modify by the preposition “sine”. So the last part should translate:

“…but without friendship we aren’t strong and life is nothing.”

Probably “valemus” would be better translated to “be well” but this is a mere guess and nothing I know from Latin.

Best regards and hope this helps,

Andrus
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Postby Ni » Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:38 pm

hey, Andrus, thanks a lot for resolving problems for me. sometimes Englsih barriers me. :D
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Postby Andrus » Fri Dec 02, 2005 2:58 pm

Hi Ni,

You are welcome. :D

I have read the Latin sentence again and there are only one thing I think I can advise you. You have translated “semper” as “often” but I think it should be “always”.

For the rest it seems right to me but I will wait for a more expert person to tell us.

Best regards,

Andrus
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