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Auxilio egeo

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Auxilio egeo

Postby Deudeditus » Tue Nov 01, 2005 1:46 am

#5 Why is susceptum esse translated in the answer key as will be undertaken? Isn't susceptum esse the perfect passive participle? Estoy confusado :? .
#16 Sententiae Antiquae
... I didn't get it at all...
gràitigheas voibiss agodh (ye olde scottes gaelick spelling)
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Re: Auxilio egeo

Postby benissimus » Tue Nov 01, 2005 2:04 am

Deudeditus wrote:#5 Why is susceptum esse translated in the answer key as will be undertaken? Isn't susceptum esse the perfect passive participle? Estoy confusado :? .

I must have misread susceptum for suscepturum. Thanks for catching that.


#16 Sententiae Antiquae
... I didn't get it at all...

didn't get the meaning or the grammar?
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Deudeditus » Tue Nov 01, 2005 4:03 pm

Aiunt enim multum legendum esse, non multa.
I didn't get the multum, -a bit. I re-looked it over and multum can mean great things, like magnum, right? Here's my best shot: Truly they said that a great thing should be gathered/read, not many things... Then I read that a neuter acc. can act as an adverb, but I don't think that Whlck's would introduce that in SA sine exemplo. I don't know why it's giving me so much trouble. :evil:
Aiunt- he/ they said
enim- truly, for, indeed, etc.
multum- great(?) thing
legendum esse- passive periphrastic (legere<legendum (future passive participle) + esse = is to be read, should be read.(esse remains in the infinitive b/c it's an indirect statement.
non- not
multa- many things
That should maybe give a clue to my problem.
thanks
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Postby Deudeditus » Wed Nov 02, 2005 3:54 am

I just finished 'The Death of Laocoon... and Troy'. Did Virgil use the present tense in the last two paragraphs to draw the reader into the story, because I actually got excited when the switch from past to present.
I really only have one question... Tum gemini serpentes potentes, mare prementes, ab insula ad litora currunt. how do the snakes pursue the sea? And why is currunt in the present tense? Shouldn't it be currebant or something?

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Postby benissimus » Sun Nov 06, 2005 6:23 am

Deudeditus wrote:Aiunt enim multum legendum esse, non multa.
I didn't get the multum, -a bit. I re-looked it over and multum can mean great things, like magnum, right? Here's my best shot: Truly they said that a great thing should be gathered/read, not many things... Then I read that a neuter acc. can act as an adverb, but I don't think that Whlck's would introduce that in SA sine exemplo. I don't know why it's giving me so much trouble. :evil:
Aiunt- he/ they said
enim- truly, for, indeed, etc.
multum- great(?) thing
legendum esse- passive periphrastic (legere<legendum (future passive participle) + esse = is to be read, should be read.(esse remains in the infinitive b/c it's an indirect statement.
non- not
multa- many things
That should maybe give a clue to my problem.
thanks

multum doesn't really mean "great" in any scenario. I think "much", the usual translation of it in the singular, would do fine here. It does actually make better sense with multum as an adverb, i.e. "one should read a lot, not many things", where there is a sort of pun between the singular/plural of multum (lost in English, of course).

I just finished 'The Death of Laocoon... and Troy'. Did Virgil use the present tense in the last two paragraphs to draw the reader into the story, because I actually got excited when the switch from past to present.
I really only have one question... Tum gemini serpentes potentes, mare prementes, ab insula ad litora currunt. how do the snakes pursue the sea? And why is currunt in the present tense? Shouldn't it be currebant or something?

This passage is actually quite close in phrasing to the original, so you have to expect some difficulty in translation. Fortunately for you, they have made the word order much easier to read than in the Aeneid.

mare prementes: I think the meaning of the verb is more literal here, i.e. "pressing (upon) the sea". My instructor suggested that they were "surfing" towards the coast.

currunt: present tense is more vivid when telling stories. In fact, in the original, the majority of this passage is in the present tense.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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