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egeo aut careo?

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egeo aut careo?

Postby Deudeditus » Mon Sep 26, 2005 4:22 pm

In ch. 21 P&R I translated #15 as: Multae patriae bellis delentur quae pace vera carent, but the answer key that Benissimus gave used egent instead. What's the difference between the two? I'm having a hard time figuring it out.

#17: I wrote down Nisi studia gravia nos delectant, pecuniae laudisve causā saepe negleguntur. Did I use the enclictic properly?

Gratias vobis.
That's all for now... :)
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Re: egeo aut careo?

Postby benissimus » Mon Sep 26, 2005 11:05 pm

Deudeditus wrote:In ch. 21 P&R I translated #15 as: Multae patriae bellis delentur quae pace vera carent, but the answer key that Benissimus gave used egent instead. What's the difference between the two? I'm having a hard time figuring it out.

They are often mere synonyms, but carere often suggests that the person does not have something out of his own free will: "to deprive oneself" (e.g. uino, Veneris fructu). Also, egere tends to show a lack of something that is needed (money would fit here), whereas carere tends to show a lack of something that you wouldn't want to have anyways (e.g. uitio, morbo, morte, tyranno; this sometimes corresponds to the wilful deprivation); carere is broader in meaning and covers that use of egere as well. This sort of minor distinction probably isn't going to be the difference between a right and wrong answer in this textbook or any other, so I wouldn't be concerned about not matching the key's answer.

#17: I wrote down Nisi studia gravia nos delectant, pecuniae laudisve causā saepe negleguntur. Did I use the enclictic properly?

Yes, you used the enclitic correctly. It is appended to the same word and in the same manner in which you would use -que, but with a different meaning of course.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Deudeditus » Tue Sep 27, 2005 1:27 am

Mas preguntas de ch.21
#9- Vulgus vult decipi can vulgus refer to vir atque populus?

in Vergilii ecloga qui in capite XXI scribitur:
... terra ipsa omnibus hominibus omnia parabit... "all mankind" is in the dative, correct? This passage was particularly hard for me, for some reason... :? But I managed to get it right, but with a rougher, choppier translation than the Venerable Ben. has given. In verbos quae a Napoleone Dynamite dicta sunt: "Flippin dulce!" :D
haha.
oh, and feel free to harshly correct any latin interspersed in my posts like "flippin dulce!" :D
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Postby benissimus » Tue Sep 27, 2005 3:40 am

Deudeditus wrote:Mas preguntas de ch.21
#9- Vulgus vult decipi can vulgus refer to vir atque populus?

vulgus really refers to the body of the common people, i.e. the peasantry. I did however recently find an example in which it seemed better to translate it "common person" (Cat. LXXII "Dilexi tum te non tantum ut vulgus amicam"), but it still wasn't talking about a specific common man.

in Vergilii ecloga qui in capite XXI scribitur:
... terra ipsa omnibus hominibus omnia parabit... "all mankind" is in the dative, correct? This passage was particularly hard for me, for some reason... :? But I managed to get it right, but with a rougher, choppier translation than the Venerable Ben. has given. In verbos quae a Napoleone Dynamite dicta sunt: "Flippin dulce!" :D
haha.
oh, and feel free to harshly correct any latin interspersed in my posts like "flippin dulce!" :D

omnibus hominibus is in fact dative, though "mankind" would be a loose translation for homo in the plural. Also, you seem to have given verbum the wrong genitals again (disregarding the fact that in + acc. means "into"); flippin can of course only appear second in its clause and must be followed up by a locative, but I am sure you already knew that and were just testing me.

uale bene Deudedite.
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Postby Deudeditus » Tue Sep 27, 2005 4:28 pm

How embarassing! :oops: maybe it was a typo... "I" is pretty close to "O"... haha, no typos involved, just mistakes :oops: :roll: Next time I won't mess with verbum's proper genitals. :lol:

flippin can of course only appear second in its clause and must be followed up by a locative, but I am sure you already knew that and were just testing me.


No, I didn't know that :o. though If i had known it, I would have definitely tested you on it... Why must flippin only appear 2nd and followed by a locative?
And concerning the locative... I hear about it all the time, but wheelock's doesn't talk much about it.. Or I've missed everything about it. :oops:
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Postby FiliusLunae » Tue Sep 27, 2005 7:27 pm

Deudeditus wrote:And concerning the locative... I hear about it all the time, but wheelock's doesn't talk much about it.. Or I've missed everything about it. :oops:

It's mentioned in Ch. 37, section "Constructions of Place and Time."

8)
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Postby benissimus » Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:41 am

Deudeditus wrote:No, I didn't know that :o. though If i had known it, I would have definitely tested you on it... Why must flippin only appear 2nd and followed by a locative?

all film phrases are framed in this manner.
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Postby Deudeditus » Wed Sep 28, 2005 4:39 pm

dulci flippin! :)
right?
Is there a reason for this construction?
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